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clad1

[klad] /klæd/
verb
1.
a simple past tense and past participle of clothe.
adjective, (usually used in combination)
2.
dressed:
ill-clad vagrants.
3.
covered:
vine-clad cottages.
Origin
950
before 950; Middle English cladd(e), Old English clāthod(e) clothed. See clothe, -ed2

clad2

[klad] /klæd/
verb (used with object), clad, cladding.
1.
to bond a metal to (another metal), especially to provide with a protective coat.
Origin
1935-40; special use of clad1

clad-

1.
variant of clado- before a vowel.

clothe

[klohth] /kloʊð/
verb (used with object), clothed or clad, clothing.
1.
to dress; attire.
2.
to provide with clothing.
3.
to cover with or as with clothing.
Origin
before 950; Middle English clothen, Old English clāthian, derivative of clāth cloth
Related forms
half-clothed, adjective
preclothe, verb (used with object), preclothed, preclothing.
reclothe, verb (used with object), reclothed or reclad, reclothing.
underclothed, adjective
well-clothed, adjective
Can be confused
close, cloth, clothe, clothes, cloze (see synonym study at close)
Synonyms
1. robe, garb, array, accouter, bedeck.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for clad
  • Every few blocks a coffeehouse, the interior usually clad in warm wood, seems to pop up.
  • We've all heard scantily clad spokespeople make bogus claims about instant weight-loss supplements on late-night television.
  • The new monarch, clad in golden robes, was carried off in a gilded palanquin.
  • The log that creates the waterfall is clad in thin copper sheeting, pressed and glued to highlight underlying bark patterns.
  • And nobody would be surprised to see your head clad in a big piece of dark plastic, either.
  • Onlookers admire a shoulder-mounted flame instrument and its scantily clad fire player.
  • There came a lady clad in grey in the twilight shining: one moment she would stand and stay, her hair with flowers en-twining.
  • The stars were there, and scantily clad dancers celebrated boundaries and wickets.
  • But by evening he may well be clad in a robe and yarmulke, chanting ancient prayers in a darkened synagogue.
  • Also, if you're a fan of scantily clad people of both genders, this is the book for you.
British Dictionary definitions for clad

clad1

/klæd/
verb
1.
a past participle of clothe
Word Origin
Old English clāthode clothed, from clāthian to clothe

clad2

/klæd/
verb clads, cladding, clad
1.
(transitive) to bond a metal to (another metal), esp to form a protective coating
Word Origin
C14 (in the obsolete sense: to clothe): special use of clad1

clothe

/kləʊð/
verb (transitive) clothes, clothing, clothed, clad
1.
to dress or attire (a person)
2.
to provide with clothing or covering
3.
to conceal or disguise
4.
to endow or invest
Word Origin
Old English clāthian, from clāthcloth; related to Old Norse klætha
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for clad
adj.

"clothed," c.1300, mid-13c., from clad, alternative past tense and past participle of clothe. Old English had geclæþd, past participle of clæþan.

clothe

v.

Old English claðian, from claþ (see cloth). Related: Clothed, clothing. Other Old English words for this were scrydan and gewædian.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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