cobble

1 [kob-uhl]

Origin:
1490–1500; apparently back formation from cobbler

Dictionary.com Unabridged

cobble

2 [kob-uhl]
noun
1.
a cobblestone.
2.
cobbles, coal in lumps larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder.
3.
Metalworking.
a.
a defect in a rolled piece resulting from loss of control over its movement.
b.
Slang. a piece showing bad workmanship.
verb (used with object), cobbled, cobbling.
4.
to pave with cobblestones.

Origin:
1595–1605; perhaps cob + -le; see cobblestone

cobble

3 [kob-uhl]
noun
New England, New York State, and New Jersey. (especially in placenames) a rounded hill.

Origin:
1885–95; perhaps < cobble2

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
cobble1 (ˈkɒbəl)
 
n
1.  short for cobblestone
2.  geology a rock fragment, often rounded, with a diameter of 64--256 mm and thus smaller than a boulder but larger than a pebble
 
vb
3.  (tr) to pave (a road) with cobblestones
 
[C15 (in cobblestone): from cob1]
 
'cobbled1
 
adj

cobble2 (ˈkɒbəl)
 
vb
1.  to make or mend (shoes)
2.  to put together clumsily
 
[C15: back formation from cobbler1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

cobble
"paving stone," late 14c., probably a dim. of cob.

cobble
"to mend clumsily," 1496, probably from cob, perhaps via a notion of lumps.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
cobble   (kŏb'əl)  Pronunciation Key 
A rock fragment larger than a pebble and smaller than a boulder. Pebbles have a diameter between 64 and 256 mm (2.56 and 10.24 inches) and are often rounded.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Evolution is a strange process indeed, to cobble together organisms who so
  completely and emotionally reject it.
Not sure what this paper was attempting to cobble together, but it failed.
But keep in mind that adjunct jobs don't pay a living wage, even if you were to
  cobble together several of them.
Somebody will cobble together that belated committee report.
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Images for cobble
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