colleague

[kol-eeg]
noun
an associate.

Origin:
1515–25; < Middle French collegue < Latin collēga, equivalent to col- col-1 + -lēga, derivative of legere to choose, gather

colleagueship, noun
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World English Dictionary
colleague (ˈkɒliːɡ)
 
n
a fellow worker or member of a staff, department, profession, etc
 
[C16: from French collègue, from Latin collēga one selected at the same time as another, from com- together + lēgāre to choose]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

colleague
1533, from M.Fr. collègue, from L. collega "partner in office," from com- "with" + leg-, stem of legare "to choose." So, "one chosen to work with another."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He then became supple in action and large in motive, whatever he thought of his
  colleagues.
To many of his colleagues, he appeared uninterested in anything other than
  mathematics.
He and his colleagues advertised extensively and received many calls.
Mini-deadlines and friendly, but annoying colleagues seem to work for me.
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