condemn

[kuhn-dem]
verb (used with object)
1.
to express an unfavorable or adverse judgment on; indicate strong disapproval of; censure.
2.
to pronounce to be guilty; sentence to punishment: to condemn a murderer to life imprisonment.
3.
to give grounds or reason for convicting or censuring: His acts condemn him.
4.
to judge or pronounce to be unfit for use or service: to condemn an old building.
5.
U.S. Law. to acquire ownership of for a public purpose, under the right of eminent domain: The city condemned the property.
6.
to force into a specific state or activity: His lack of education condemned him to a life of menial jobs.
7.
to declare incurable.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English condempnen < Anglo-French, Old French condem(p)ner < Latin condemnāre. See con-, damn

condemnable [kuhn-dem-nuh-buhl] , adjective
condemnably, adverb
condemner [kuhn-dem-er] , condemnor [kuhn-dem-er, kuhn-dem-nawr] , noun
condemningly, adverb
recondemn, verb (used with object)
self-condemned, adjective
self-condemning, adjective
uncondemnable, adjective
uncondemned, adjective
uncondemning, adjective
uncondemningly, adverb

1. blame, censure, condemn (see synonym study at blame) ; 2. condemn, contemn.


1. See blame.


2. exonerate, liberate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
condemn (kənˈdɛm)
 
vb
1.  to express strong disapproval of; censure
2.  to pronounce judicial sentence on
3.  to demonstrate the guilt of: his secretive behaviour condemned him
4.  to judge or pronounce unfit for use: that food has been condemned
5.  to compel or force into a particular state or activity: his disposition condemned him to boredom
 
[C13: from Old French condempner, from Latin condemnāre, from damnāre to condemn; see damn]
 
condemnable
 
adj
 
con'demnably
 
adv
 
condem'nation
 
n
 
con'demner
 
n
 
con'demningly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

condemn
c.1300, from O.Fr. condemner, from L. condemnare, from com- intensive prefix + damnare "to harm, damage." Replaced O.E. fordeman.

condemned
1540s, "found guilty, at fault," pp. adj. from condemn. Of property, "found unfit for use," from 1798.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
And that condemned food, which my sister grew up obliviously consuming in
  copious amounts, was pumpkin.
The park reprieved a living system condemned to die under the pressure of
  progress.
Medieval jousting tournaments were condemned by church and state from the
  earliest days of their existence.
It turns out they're not all condemned to eventual exile.
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