consummate

[v. kon-suh-meyt; adj. kuhn-suhm-it, kon-suh-mit]
verb (used with object), consummated, consummating.
1.
to bring to a state of perfection; fulfill.
2.
to complete (an arrangement, agreement, or the like) by a pledge or the signing of a contract: The company consummated its deal to buy a smaller firm.
3.
to complete (the union of a marriage) by the first marital sexual intercourse.
adjective
4.
complete or perfect; supremely skilled; superb: a consummate master of the violin.
5.
being of the highest or most extreme degree: a work of consummate skill; an act of consummate savagery.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English (adj.) < Latin consummātus (past participle of consummāre to complete, bring to perfection), equivalent to con- con- + summ(a) sum + -ātus -ate1

consummately, adverb
consummative, consummatory [kuhn-suhm-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
consummator, noun
half-consummated, adjective
unconsummate, adjective
unconsummately, adverb
unconsummated, adjective
unconsummative, adjective


1. complete, perfect, finish, accomplish, achieve.


4. imperfect, unfinished.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
consummate
 
vb
1.  to bring to completion or perfection; fulfil
2.  to complete (a marriage) legally by sexual intercourse
 
adj
3.  accomplished or supremely skilled: a consummate artist
4.  (prenominal) (intensifier): a consummate fool
 
[C15: from Latin consummāre to complete, from summus highest, utmost]
 
con'summately
 
adv
 
consum'mation
 
n
 
'consummative
 
adj
 
con'summatory
 
adj
 
'consummator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

consummate
c.1430, from L. consummatus "perfected, complete," pp. of consummare (see consummation). Of persons, "accomplished, very qualified," from 1640s. Related: Consummately (1610s).

consummate
1520s, "to bring to completion," from L. consummat-, pp. stem of consummare "to sum up, make up, complete, finish" (see consummation). Meaning "to bring a marriage to completion" (by sexual intercourse) is from 1530s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It certainly makes it clear to the rest of us what the deniers are about when
  they all turn out to be such consummate liars.
The ideal candidate will be a consummate fund-raiser and friend-raiser.
Even when both partners seem willing, males are often unable to consummate the
  affair.
Hammerhead sharks are consummate predators that use their oddly shaped heads to
  improve their ability to find prey.
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