consummator

consummate

[v. kon-suh-meyt; adj. kuhn-suhm-it, kon-suh-mit]
verb (used with object), consummated, consummating.
1.
to bring to a state of perfection; fulfill.
2.
to complete (an arrangement, agreement, or the like) by a pledge or the signing of a contract: The company consummated its deal to buy a smaller firm.
3.
to complete (the union of a marriage) by the first marital sexual intercourse.
adjective
4.
complete or perfect; supremely skilled; superb: a consummate master of the violin.
5.
being of the highest or most extreme degree: a work of consummate skill; an act of consummate savagery.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English (adj.) < Latin consummātus (past participle of consummāre to complete, bring to perfection), equivalent to con- con- + summ(a) sum + -ātus -ate1

consummately, adverb
consummative, consummatory [kuhn-suhm-uh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee] , adjective
consummator, noun
half-consummated, adjective
unconsummate, adjective
unconsummately, adverb
unconsummated, adjective
unconsummative, adjective


1. complete, perfect, finish, accomplish, achieve.


4. imperfect, unfinished.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
consummate
 
vb
1.  to bring to completion or perfection; fulfil
2.  to complete (a marriage) legally by sexual intercourse
 
adj
3.  accomplished or supremely skilled: a consummate artist
4.  (prenominal) (intensifier): a consummate fool
 
[C15: from Latin consummāre to complete, from summus highest, utmost]
 
con'summately
 
adv
 
consum'mation
 
n
 
'consummative
 
adj
 
con'summatory
 
adj
 
'consummator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

consummate
c.1430, from L. consummatus "perfected, complete," pp. of consummare (see consummation). Of persons, "accomplished, very qualified," from 1640s. Related: Consummately (1610s).

consummate
1520s, "to bring to completion," from L. consummat-, pp. stem of consummare "to sum up, make up, complete, finish" (see consummation). Meaning "to bring a marriage to completion" (by sexual intercourse) is from 1530s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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