conviction

[kuhn-vik-shuhn]
noun
1.
a fixed or firm belief: No clever argument, no persuasive fact or theory could make a dent in his conviction in the rightness of his position.
2.
the act of convicting; a declaration that a person is guilty of an offense.
3.
the state of being convicted.
4.
the act of moving a person by argument or evidence to belief, agreement, consent, or a course of action; the act of convincing.
5.
the state of being convinced.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Late Latin convictiōn- (stem of convictiō) proof (of guilt). See convict, -ion

convictional, adjective
nonconviction, noun
preconviction, noun
proconviction, adjective
reconviction, noun


1. See belief.


5. doubt, uncertainty.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
conviction (kənˈvɪkʃən)
 
n
1.  the state or appearance of being convinced
2.  a fixed or firmly held belief, opinion, etc
3.  the act of convincing
4.  the act or an instance of convicting or the state of being convicted
5.  carry conviction to be convincing
 
con'victional
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

conviction
late 15c., "the proving of guilt," from L. convictionem, noun of action from convincere (see convince). Meaning "mental state of being convinced" is from 1690s; that of "firm belief, a belief held as proven" is from 1841.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

conviction

see courage of one's convictions.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
The biggest reality of the world is a matter neither of conjecture, belief, nor
  moral conviction.
But for all its brutality, his sentence followed trial and conviction.
Four weeks of nearly continuous tracking provided the basis of an indictment
  and subsequent conviction for drug trafficking.
Our elected officials may, for political reasons or from genuine conviction,
  choose to regulate a technology.
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