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costume

[n. kos-toom, -tyoom; v. ko-stoom, -styoom]
noun
1.
a style of dress, including accessories and hairdos, especially that peculiar to a nation, region, group, or historical period.
2.
dress or garb characteristic of another period, place, person, etc., as worn on the stage or at balls.
3.
fashion of dress appropriate to a particular occasion or season: dancing costume; winter costume.
4.
a set of garments, especially women's garments, selected for wear at a single time; outfit; ensemble.
verb (used with object), costumed, costuming.
5.
to dress; furnish with a costume; provide appropriate dress for: to costume a play.
adjective
6.
of or characterized by the wearing of costumes: a costume party.
7.
meant for use with or appropriate to a specific costume: costume accessories.

Origin:
1705–15; < French < Italian: usage, habit, dress; doublet of custom

recostume, verb (used with object), recostumed, recostuming.
uncostumed, adjective
well-costumed, adjective


1. See dress.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
costume (ˈkɒstjuːm)
 
n
1.  a complete style of dressing, including all the clothes, accessories, etc, worn at one time, as in a particular country or period; dress: national costume
2.  old-fashioned a woman's suit
3.  a set of clothes, esp unusual or period clothes, worn in a play by an actor or at a fancy dress ball: a jester's costume
4.  short for swimming costume
 
vb
5.  to furnish the costumes for (a show, film, etc)
6.  to dress (someone) in a costume
 
[C18: from French, from Italian: dress, habit, custom]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

costume
1715, art term, from Fr., from It., from L. consuetudo "custom," and essentially the same word as custom but arriving by a different etymology. From "customary clothes of the particular period in which the scene is laid," meaning broadened by 1818 to "any defined mode of dress." Costume jewelry is first
attested 1933.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Witty, sometimes bawdy, skater names and costuming lend an air of performance
  to the sport.
Nothing is more essential to the proper costuming of any figure, and especially
  of a poor one, than the corsets and the lingerie.
All that the camera's scope, superb photography, and opulent costuming could
  give it has been given to it here.
All that the camera's scope, superb photography and opulent costuming could
  give it has been given to it here.
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