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daft

[daft, dahft] /dæft, dɑft/
adjective, dafter, daftest.
1.
senseless, stupid, or foolish.
2.
insane; crazy.
3.
Scot. merry; playful; frolicsome.
Origin
1000
before 1000; Middle English dafte uncouth, awkward; earlier, gentle, meek, Old English dæfte; cf. deft
Related forms
daftly, adverb
daftness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for daft
  • Idealism may seem a little daft at first blush.
  • Are you daft or joking? “Ostentatious” is indeed a word.
  • His friends, he says, inquired whether he was daft.
  • You spurious comment is alarmist, uncorroborated, illiterate and frankly daft.
  • Money handouts which stop people working are just daft.
  • To see this battle between slightly daft ideology and old fashioned economics up close, just look at certificate authorities.
  • This kind of talk is daft to most investors.
  • However, I have just had a really off day and made a series of daft mistakes in front of my grammar class of 30 students.
  • It doesn't strike me as an obviously daft idea.
  • Admitting that many people might find the idea “daft,” he could not rule out using icebergs.
British Dictionary definitions for daft

daft

/dɑːft/
adjective (mainly Brit)
1.
(informal) foolish, simple, or stupid
2.
a slang word for insane
3.
(informal) (postpositive) foll by about. extremely fond (of)
4.
(slang) frivolous; giddy
Derived Forms
daftly, adverb
daftness, noun
Word Origin
Old English gedæfte gentle, foolish; related to Middle Low German ondaft incapable
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for daft
adj.

Old English gedæfte "gentle, becoming," from Proto-Germanic *gadaftjaz (cf. Old English daeftan "to put in order, arrange," gedafen "suitable;" Gothic gadaban "to be fit"), from PIE *dhabh- "to fit together." Sense progression from "mild" (c.1200) to "dull" (c.1300) to "foolish" (mid-15c.) to "crazy" (1530s) probably was influenced by analogy with daffe "halfwit."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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