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damning

[dam-ing, dam-ning] /ˈdæm ɪŋ, ˈdæm nɪŋ/
adjective
1.
causing incrimination:
damning evidence.
Origin of damning
1590-1600
1590-1600; damn + -ing2
Related forms
damningly, adverb
damningness, noun
self-damning, adjective

damn

[dam] /dæm/
verb (used with object)
1.
to declare (something) to be bad, unfit, invalid, or illegal.
2.
to condemn as a failure:
to damn a play.
3.
to bring condemnation upon; ruin.
4.
to doom to eternal punishment or condemn to hell.
5.
to swear at or curse, using the word “damn”:
Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!
verb (used without object)
6.
to use the word “damn”; swear.
interjection
7.
(used as an expletive to express anger, annoyance, disgust, etc.)
noun
8.
the utterance of “damn” in swearing or for emphasis.
9.
something of negligible value:
not worth a damn.
adjective
10.
damned (defs 2, 3).
adverb
11.
Idioms
12.
damn well, Informal. damned (def 7).
13.
damn with faint praise, to praise so moderately as, in effect, to condemn:
The critic damned the opera with faint praise when he termed the production adequate.
14.
give a damn, Informal. to care; be concerned; consider as important:
You shouldn't give a damn about their opinions.
Also, give a darn.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English dam(p)nen < Old French dam(p)ner < Latin damnāre to condemn, derivative of damnum damage, fine, harm
Related forms
damner, noun
predamn, verb (used with object)
Synonyms
2. berate, censure, denounce, disparage, blast.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for damning
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • How have I a right to make another pay for the saving of my soul, or to assist me in damning his?

    Winterslow William Hazlitt
  • Our eyes are shut to the damning facts which confront us on every side.

    The Truth About Woman C. Gasquoine Hartley
  • His hypocrisy was of such a deep and damning character, I can hardly forbear giving his name.

    Secret Band of Brothers Jonathan Harrington Green
  • Why had this damning evidence been allowed to sink into oblivion?

    The White Desert Courtney Ryley Cooper
  • Smith's foot-prints were there in damning contrast to her own.

    The Flaming Jewel Robert W. Chambers
British Dictionary definitions for damning

damn

/dæm/
interjection
1.
(slang) an exclamation of annoyance (often in exclamatory phrases such as damn it! damn you! etc)
2.
(informal) an exclamation of surprise or pleasure (esp in the exclamatory phrase damn me!)
adjective
3.
(prenominal) (slang) deserving damnation; detestable
adverb, adjective (prenominal)
4.
(slang) (intensifier): damn fool, a damn good pianist
adverb
5.
(slang) damn all, absolutely nothing
verb (mainly transitive)
6.
to condemn as bad, worthless, etc
7.
to curse
8.
to condemn to eternal damnation
9.
(often passive) to doom to ruin; cause to fail: the venture was damned from the start
10.
(also intransitive) to prove (someone) guilty: damning evidence
11.
to swear (at) using the word damn
12.
(Brit, informal) as near as damn it, as near as possible; very near
13.
damn with faint praise, to praise so unenthusiastically that the effect is condemnation
noun
14.
(slang) something of negligible value; jot (esp in the phrase not worth a damn)
15.
(informal) not give a damn, to be unconcerned; not care
Word Origin
C13: from Old French dampner, from Latin damnāre to injure, condemn, from damnum loss, injury, penalty
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for damning

damn

v.

late 13c., "to condemn," from Old French damner "damn, condemn; convict, blame; injure," derivative of Latin damnare "to adjudge guilty; to doom; to condemn, blame, reject," from noun damnum "damage, hurt, harm; loss, injury; a fine, penalty," possibly from an ancient religious term from PIE *dap- "to apportion in exchange" [see Watkins]. The Latin word evolved a legal meaning of "pronounce judgment upon." Theological sense is first recorded early 14c.; the optative expletive use likely is as old.

Damn and its derivatives generally were avoided in print from 18c. to c.1930s (the famous line in the film version of "Gone with the Wind" was a breakthrough and required much effort by the studio). The noun is recorded from 1610s; to be not worth a damn is from 1817. The adjective is 1775, short for damned; Damn Yankee, characteristic Southern U.S. term for "Northerner," is attested from 1812. Related: Damning.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for damning

dally

Related Terms

dilly-dally

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Idioms and Phrases with damning
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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