deadening

[ded-n-ing]
noun
1.
a device or material employed to deaden or render dull.
2.
a device or material preventing the transmission of sound.
3.
a woodland in which the trees are killed by girdling prior to being cleared.

Origin:
1775–85; deaden + -ing1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

deaden

[ded-n]
verb (used with object)
1.
to make less sensitive, active, energetic, or forcible; weaken: to deaden sound; to deaden the senses; to deaden the force of a blow.
2.
to lessen the velocity of; retard: to deaden the headway of a ship.
3.
to make impervious to sound, as a floor.
verb (used without object)
4.
to become dead.

Origin:
1655–65; dead + -en1

deadener, noun
undeadened, adjective


1. blunt, diminish, lessen, numb, dull.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
deaden (ˈdɛdən)
 
vb
1.  to make or become less sensitive, intense, lively, etc; damp or be damped down; dull
2.  (tr) to make acoustically less resonant: he deadened the room with heavy curtains
 
'deadener
 
n
 
'deadening
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

deaden
1660s "deprive of or diminish (some quality)," from dead. Earlier the verb was simply dead.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
In these lean times fewer cows conceive, and fewer calves survive the crucial
  crunch of summer before the deadening of winter.
Our surroundings became ever swampier, darker, more leafless-burned not by fire
  but by deadening cold.
The philosophy student's talk was confusing and deadening.
Only a writer of verve could make these potentially deadening subjects
  compelling.
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