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defect

[n. dee-fekt, dih-fekt; v. dih-fekt] /n. ˈdi fɛkt, dɪˈfɛkt; v. dɪˈfɛkt/
noun
1.
a shortcoming, fault, or imperfection:
a defect in an argument; a defect in a machine.
2.
lack or want, especially of something essential to perfection or completeness; deficiency:
a defect in hearing.
3.
Also called crystal defect, lattice defect. Crystallography. a discontinuity in the lattice of a crystal caused by missing or extra atoms or ions, or by dislocations.
verb (used without object)
4.
to desert a cause, country, etc., especially in order to adopt another (often followed by from or to):
He defected from the U.S.S.R to the West.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin dēfectus failure, weakness, equivalent to dēfec- variant stem of dēficere to run short, fail, weaken (see deficient) + -tus suffix of v. action
Related forms
defectible, adjective
defectibility, noun
defectless, adjective
nondefecting, adjective
predefect, noun
redefect, verb (used without object)
Synonyms
1. Defect, blemish, flaw refer to faults that detract from perfection. Defect is the general word for any kind of shortcoming or imperfection, whether literal or figurative: a defect in eyesight, in a plan. A blemish is usually a defect on a surface, which mars the appearance: a blemish on her cheek. Flaw is applied to a defect in quality, caused by imperfect structure (as in a diamond) or brought about during manufacture (as in texture of cloth, in clearness of glass, etc.).
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for defect
  • There could be a manufacturing defect or flawed design, or the part may have been installed improperly, he noted.
  • The defect prevents the body from eliminating ammonia, a toxic breakdown product of protein metabolism.
  • Ventricular septal defect describes one or more holes in the wall that separates the right and left ventricles of the heart.
  • He is an engineer and does structural defect investigations and is out in the sun a lot.
  • To him, every mental illness stemmed from a physical defect in the brain.
  • They have myriad difficulties based upon what amounts to a physical defect.
  • And some elected opposition candidates are already thought eager to defect.
  • It borders on mental illness or intellectual defect.
  • Without treatment, the defect is usually fatal within the first several days of life.
  • How idiotic to still cling to the outdated argument that if they don't make tens of millions of year they'll defect.
British Dictionary definitions for defect

defect

noun (dɪˈfɛkt; ˈdiːfɛkt)
1.
a lack of something necessary for completeness or perfection; shortcoming; deficiency
2.
an imperfection, failing, or blemish
3.
(crystallog) a local deviation from regularity in the crystal lattice of a solid See also point defect, dislocation (sense 3)
verb (dɪˈfɛkt)
4.
(intransitive) to desert one's country, cause, allegiance, etc, esp in order to join the opposing forces
Derived Forms
defector, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Latin dēfectus, from dēficere to forsake, fail; see deficient
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for defect
n.

early 15c., from Middle French defect and directly from Latin defectus "failure, revolt, falling away," noun use of past participle of deficere "to fail, desert" (see deficient).

v.

1570s, from Latin defectus, past participle of deficere "to fail, desert" (see defect (n.)). Related: Defected; defecting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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defect in Medicine

defect de·fect (dē'fěkt', dĭ-fěkt')
n.
A lack of or abnormality in something necessary for normal functioning; a deficiency or imperfection.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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defect in Technology


bug

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Encyclopedia Article for defect

crystal defect

imperfection in the regular geometrical arrangement of the atoms in a crystalline solid. These imperfections result from deformation of the solid, rapid cooling from high temperature, or high-energy radiation (X-rays or neutrons) striking the solid. Located at single points, along lines, or on whole surfaces in the solid, these defects influence its mechanical, electrical, and optical behaviour.

Learn more about crystal defect with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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