dislocation

[dis-loh-key-shuhn]
noun
1.
an act or instance of dislocating.
2.
the state of being dislocated.
3.
Crystallography. (in a crystal lattice) a line about which there is a discontinuity in the lattice structure. Compare defect ( def 3 ).

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English dislocacioun; see dislocate, -ion

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
dislocation (ˌdɪsləˈkeɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of displacing or the state of being displaced; disruption
2.  (esp of the bones in a joint) the state or condition of being dislocated
3.  a line, plane, or region in which there is a discontinuity in the regularity of a crystal lattice
4.  geology a less common word for fault

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dislocation
c.1400, originally of bones, from O.Fr. dislocation (14c.), or directly from M.L. dislocationem, noun of action from dislocare (see dislocate). General sense is from c.1600.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

dislocation dis·lo·ca·tion (dĭs'lō-kā'shən)
n.
Displacement of a body part, especially the temporary displacement of a bone from its normal position; luxation.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
dislocation   (dĭs'lō-kā'shən)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. Displacement of a bone from its normal position, especially at a joint.

  2. Geology See displacement.

  3. An imperfection in the crystal structure of a metal or other solid resulting from an absence of an atom or atoms in one or more layers of a crystal.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
His was the solitude, self-doubt and restlessness of dislocation and
  displacement.
Vomiting as a reaction to that dislocation of the senses was therefore a
  successful survival strategy.
The global nature of temperature changes as a snowflake floats in a cold fog
  does not seem to explain the dislocation corrections.
Not every combat veteran emerges from war with this sense of dislocation.
Image for dislocation
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