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defection

[dih-fek-shuh n] /dɪˈfɛk ʃən/
noun
1.
desertion from allegiance, loyalty, duty, or the like; apostasy:
His defection to East Germany was regarded as treasonable.
2.
failure; lack; loss:
He was overcome by a sudden defection of courage.
Origin
1535-1545
1535-45; < Latin dēfectiōn- (stem of dēfectiō), equivalent to dēfect(us) (see defect) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
nondefection, noun
redefection, noun
Antonyms
1. loyalty.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for defection
  • Some of this is self-correcting, as in the case of my own defection.
  • But it also led to a nearly complete defection of all the participants to the punishing group.
  • In the game, cooperation and defection result in differing payoffs depending on what the other participants do.
  • Because of her previous views, each swing of her pendulum was akin to a celebrated defection to an enemy camp.
  • The primary origin of moral instincts is the dynamic relation between cooperation and defection.
  • Even now none of the ballplayers believes a sports agent had selected them for defection and arranged their transport.
  • Nor has the firm been helped by the defection of some of its top talent to rival arbitrageurs.
  • Most probably the flight that killed him was a bold attempt at defection.
  • In effect, people have been told that defection is the proper thing to do.
  • defection could, indeed, signal a lack of professional fitness.
British Dictionary definitions for defection

defection

/dɪˈfɛkʃən/
noun
1.
the act or an instance of defecting
2.
abandonment of duty, allegiance, principles, etc; backsliding
3.
another word for defect (sense 1), defect (sense 2)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for defection
n.

1540s, "action of failing;" 1550s, "action of deserting a party, leader, etc." from Latin defectionem (nominative defectio) "desertion, revolt, failure," noun of action from past participle stem of deficere (see deficient). Originally used often of faith.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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