defray

[dih-frey]
verb (used with object)
to bear or pay all or part of (the costs, expenses, etc.): The grant helped defray the expenses of the trip.

Origin:
1535–45; < Middle French défrayer, Old French deffroier to pay costs, equivalent to de- dis-1 + frayer to bear the costs, derivative of frais, fres (plural) costs, probably < Latin frācta things broken (see fracture), hence, expense incurred from breakage

defrayable, adjective
defrayer, noun
predefray, verb (used with object)
undefrayed, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
defray (dɪˈfreɪ)
 
vb
(tr) to furnish or provide money for (costs, expenses, etc); pay
 
[C16: from Old French deffroier to pay expenses, from de-dis-1 + frai expenditure, originally: cost incurred through breaking something, from Latin frangere to break]
 
de'frayable
 
adj
 
de'frayal
 
n
 
de'frayment
 
n
 
de'frayer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

defray
1540s, from M.Fr. defraier, from des- "out" + fraier "spend," from O.Fr. frais "costs, damages caused by breakage," from L. fractum, neuter pp. of frangere "to break" (see fraction). Alternative etymology traces second element to O.H.G. fridu "peace."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Many company-owned aircraft are made available to rental firms to help defray
  the cost.
The entry fee helps defray the cost of running the photo contest.
Your local water provider may even offer a rebate to help defray the cost.
The grand-geeks kicked in with some help on this matter to help us defray costs.
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