degraded

[dih-grey-did]
adjective
1.
reduced in rank, position, reputation, etc.: He felt degraded by the trivial tasks assigned to him.
2.
reduced in quality or value; debased; vulgarized: the degraded level of the modern novel.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English; see degrade, -ed2

degradedly, adverb
degradedness, noun
undegraded, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

degrade

[dih-greyd or for 3, dee-greyd]
verb (used with object), degraded, degrading.
1.
to lower in dignity or estimation; bring into contempt: He felt they were degrading him by making him report to the supervisor.
2.
to lower in character or quality; debase.
3.
to reduce (someone) to a lower rank, degree, etc.; deprive of office, rank, status, or title, especially as a punishment: degraded from director to assistant director.
4.
to reduce in amount, strength, intensity, etc.
5.
Physical Geography. to wear down by erosion, as hills. Compare aggrade.
6.
Chemistry. to break down (a compound, especially an organic hydrocarbon).
verb (used without object), degraded, degrading.
7.
to become degraded; weaken or worsen; deteriorate.
8.
Chemistry. (especially of an organic hydrocarbon compound) to break down or decompose.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English degraden < Late Latin dēgradāre, equivalent to Latin dē- de- + grad(us) grade + -āre infinitive suffix

degrader, noun


1. disgrace, dishonor, discredit. See humble. 2. abase, vitiate. 3. demote, depose, downgrade, lower, cashier, break.


1, 2. exalt. 3. promote.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To degraded
Collins
World English Dictionary
degrade (dɪˈɡreɪd)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to reduce in worth, character, etc; disgrace; dishonour
2.  (tr) to reduce in rank, status, or degree; remove from office; demote
3.  (tr) to reduce in strength, quality, intensity, etc
4.  Compare aggrade to reduce or be reduced by erosion or down-cutting, as a land surface or bed of a river
5.  chem to decompose or be decomposed into atoms or smaller molecules
 
[C14: from Late Latin dēgradāre, from Latin de- + gradus rank, degree]
 
de'grader
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

degrade
early 14c., from O.Fr. degrader (12c.), from des- "down" + L. gradus "step" (see grade).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
The mentality of consumerism has degraded our grading standards.
He did not live to see human beings degraded to the status and condition of
  vermin eradicated by an insecticidal gas.
Either that, or she degraded oratory down to the level of poetry.
It is not merely that these people are degraded but that with such people not
  enough can happen.
Synonyms
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;