delayed

[dih-leyd]
adjective Physics.
of or pertaining to a particle, as a neutron or alpha particle, that is emitted from an excited nucleus formed in a nuclear reaction, the emission occurring some time after the reaction is completed.

undelayed, adjective
well-delayed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

delay

[dih-ley]
verb (used with object)
1.
to put off to a later time; defer; postpone: The pilot delayed the flight until the weather cleared.
2.
to impede the process or progress of; retard; hinder: The dense fog delayed the plane's landing.
verb (used without object)
3.
to put off action; linger; loiter: He delayed until it was too late.
noun
4.
the act of delaying; procrastination; loitering.
5.
an instance of being delayed: There were many delays during the train trip.
6.
the period or amount of time during which something is delayed: The ballet performance began after a half-hour delay.

Origin:
1225–75; Middle English delaien (v.), delai(e) (noun) < Old French delaier (v.), delai (noun)

delayable, adjective
delayer, noun
delayingly, adverb
predelay, noun, verb
undelayable, adjective
undelaying, adjective
undelayingly, adverb


1. See defer1. 2. slow, detain. 3. procrastinate, tarry. 4. tarrying, dawdling. 5. deferment, postponement, respite.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
delay (dɪˈleɪ)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to put off to a later time; defer
2.  (tr) to slow up, hinder, or cause to be late; detain
3.  (intr) to be irresolute or put off doing something; procrastinate
4.  (intr) to linger; dawdle
 
n
5.  the act or an instance of delaying or being delayed
6.  the interval between one event and another; lull; interlude
 
[C13: from Old French delaier, from des- off + laier, variant of laissier to leave, from Latin laxāre to loosen, from laxus slack, lax]
 
de'layer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

delay
late 13c., from O.Fr. delaier, from de- "away, from" + laier "leave, let," probably a variant of L. laissier, from L. laxare "slacken, undo."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Night owls might think staying up late is a real hoot, but a new study hints
  that delayed sleep might have a sinister side.
Research has found that the onset of dementia is delayed in people who have
  more years of formal education.
If that launch gets delayed, the station would be completely de-staffed for the
  first time in more than a decade.
Despite its importance, sequencing has been delayed by the genetic complexity
  of the common commercial potato.
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