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derision

[dih-rizh-uh n] /dɪˈrɪʒ ən/
noun
1.
ridicule; mockery:
The inept performance elicited derision from the audience.
2.
an object of ridicule.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English derisioun < Old French derision < Late Latin dērīsiōn- (stem of dērīsiō), equivalent to Latin dērīs(us) mocked (past participle of dērīdēre; see deride) + -iōn- -ion
Related forms
derisible
[dih-riz-uh-buh l] /dɪˈrɪz ə bəl/ (Show IPA),
adjective
nonderisible, adjective
underisible, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for derision
  • Regardless of where one falls on the topic, derision certainly doesn't advance one's argument .
  • The comment met with immediate derision across the internet.
  • In the eyes of the world this prisoner was without power and the object of malice and derision.
  • He deserves understanding and kindness, not judgment and derision.
  • There was a note of derision in his tone.
  • Just three decades ago, the word "compromise" was not a term of derision.
  • The absurdity of this half-abolished public holiday has become the source of much confusion, resentment and derision.
  • He asked the public to end the shouts of derision.
  • They inspired ridicule, derision and jokes.
  • I'm fairly certain my snort of derision was clearly audible.
British Dictionary definitions for derision

derision

/dɪˈrɪʒən/
noun
1.
the act of deriding; mockery; scorn
2.
an object of mockery or scorn
Word Origin
C15: from Late Latin dērīsiō, from Latin dērīsus; see deride
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for derision
n.

c.1400, from Old French derision "derision, mockery" (13c.), from Latin derisionem (nominative derisio), noun of action from past participle stem of deridere "ridicule," from de- "down" (see de-) + ridere "to laugh."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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9
10
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