desperate

[des-per-it, -prit]
adjective
1.
reckless or dangerous because of despair or urgency: a desperate killer.
2.
having an urgent need, desire, etc.: desperate for attention.
3.
leaving little or no hope; very serious or dangerous: a desperate illness.
4.
extremely bad; intolerable or shocking: clothes in desperate taste.
5.
extreme or excessive.
6.
making a final, ultimate effort; giving all: a desperate attempt to save a life.
7.
actuated by a feeling of hopelessness.
8.
having no hope; giving in to despair.
noun
9.
Obsolete. a desperado.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Latin dēspērātus, past participle of dēspērāre to despair; see -ate1

desperately, adverb
desperateness, noun
quasi-desperate, adjective
quasi-desperately, adverb

desperate, disparate.


1. rash, frantic. 3. grave. See hopeless. 8. forlorn, desolate.


1. careful. 3, 8. hopeful.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
desperate (ˈdɛspərɪt, -prɪt)
 
adj (often postpositive and foll by for)
1.  careless of danger, as from despair; utterly reckless
2.  (of an act) reckless; risky
3.  used or undertaken in desperation or as a last resort: desperate measures
4.  critical; very grave: in desperate need
5.  in distress and having a great need or desire
6.  moved by or showing despair or hopelessness; despairing
 
[C15: from Latin dēspērāre to have no hope; see despair]
 
'desperately
 
adv
 
'desperateness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

desperate
late 15c., "despairing, hopeless," from L. desperatus "given up, despaired of," pp. of desperare (see despair). Sense of "driven to recklessness" is from late 15c.; weakened sense of "having a great desire for" is from 1950s. Related: Desperately.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
For the fact is that right now the economy desperately needs a short-run fix.
It is a testament to the historical divisiveness and prejudice that higher
  education is trying so desperately to overcome.
Companies are desperately seeking ways to cut costs, which mostly means cutting
  jobs.
Desperately poor farmers fought back, killing elephants to protect their land
  and livelihood.
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