follow Dictionary.com

Get the details behind our redesign

dicta

[dik-tuh] /ˈdɪk tə/
noun
1.
a plural of dictum.

dictum

[dik-tuh m] /ˈdɪk təm/
noun, plural dicta
[dik-tuh] /ˈdɪk tə/ (Show IPA),
dictums.
1.
an authoritative pronouncement; judicial assertion.
2.
a saying; maxim.
Origin
1660-1670
1660-70; < Latin: something said, a saying, command, word, noun use of neuter past participle of dīcere to say, speak; cf. index
Synonyms
1. edict, decree, fiat, order, declaration. 2. adage, proverb, truism, saw.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
British Dictionary definitions for dicta

dicta

/ˈdɪktə/
noun
1.
a plural of dictum

dictum

/ˈdɪktəm/
noun (pl) -tums, -ta (-tə)
1.
a formal or authoritative statement or assertion; pronouncement
2.
a popular saying or maxim
3.
(law) See obiter dictum
Word Origin
C16: from Latin, from dīcere to say
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for dicta
dictum
1670, from L. dictum "thing said," neut. of dictus, pp. of dicere "say" (see diction). In legal use, a judge's expression of opinion which is not the formal resolution of a case.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of The Day

Difficulty index for dicta

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for dicta

8
9
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with dicta