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disarming

[dis-ahr-ming] /dɪsˈɑr mɪŋ/
adjective
1.
removing or capable of removing hostility, suspicion, etc., as by being charming:
a disarming smile.
Origin
1540-1550
1540-50; disarm + -ing2
Related forms
disarmingly, adverb
Synonyms
winning, engaging, winsome.

disarm

[dis-ahrm] /dɪsˈɑrm/
verb (used with object)
1.
to deprive of a weapon or weapons.
2.
to remove the fuze or other actuating device from:
to disarm a bomb.
3.
to deprive of the means of attack or defense:
The lack of logic disarmed his argument.
4.
to divest or relieve of hostility, suspicion, etc.; win the affection or approval of; charm:
His smile disarmed us.
verb (used without object)
5.
to lay down one's weapons.
6.
(of a country) to reduce or limit the size, equipment, armament, etc., of the army, navy, or air force.
Origin
1325-75; Middle English < Old French desarmer. See dis-1, arm2
Related forms
disarmer, noun
undisarmed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for disarming
  • It does not make sense that law enforcement officials have to carry the entire burden for disarming troubled people with guns.
  • She grinned, yes, but her look was not entirely disarming.
  • This, as the disarming parliamentary exchange printed at the top of this column suggests, is a more complicated business.
  • He is tough, clever and has a disarming cheeky grin.
  • Maybe it was the disarming intimacy of the lyrics, or the music's balancing act between the simple and complex.
  • But it is now contemplating a much larger contingent, with the specific job of disarming the militiamen.
  • As well as being determined, he had a disarming style.
  • Or do you really believe that disarming and hoping for the best is a good policy.
  • Remarks that would sound stinging in a more solemn film are delivered with disarming breeziness, even good cheer.
  • The ending sidesteps into sentimentality, but by this time one feels affection for the disarming couple.
British Dictionary definitions for disarming

disarming

/dɪsˈɑːmɪŋ/
adjective
1.
tending to neutralize or counteract hostility, suspicion, etc
Derived Forms
disarmingly, adverb

disarm

/dɪsˈɑːm/
verb
1.
(transitive) to remove defensive or offensive capability from (a country, army, etc)
2.
(transitive) to deprive of weapons
3.
(transitive) to remove the triggering device of (a bomb, shell, etc)
4.
(transitive) to win the confidence or affection of
5.
(intransitive) (of a nation, etc) to decrease the size and capability of one's armed forces
6.
(intransitive) to lay down weapons
Derived Forms
disarmer, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for disarming

disarm

v.

late 14c., from Old French desarmer (11c.), from des- (see dis-) + armer "to arm" (see arm (v.)). The figurative sense is slightly earlier in English than the literal. Related: Disarmed; disarming.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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