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disciplined

[dis-uh-plind] /ˈdɪs ə plɪnd/
adjective
1.
having or exhibiting discipline; rigorous:
paintings characterized by a disciplined technique.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English. See discipline, -ed2
Related forms
nondisciplined, adjective
undisciplined, adjective
well-disciplined, adjective

discipline

[dis-uh-plin] /ˈdɪs ə plɪn/
noun
1.
training to act in accordance with rules; drill:
military discipline.
2.
activity, exercise, or a regimen that develops or improves a skill; training:
A daily stint at the typewriter is excellent discipline for a writer.
3.
punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.
4.
the rigor or training effect of experience, adversity, etc.:
the harsh discipline of poverty.
5.
behavior in accord with rules of conduct; behavior and order maintained by training and control:
good discipline in an army.
6.
a set or system of rules and regulations.
7.
Ecclesiastical. the system of government regulating the practice of a church as distinguished from its doctrine.
8.
an instrument of punishment, especially a whip or scourge, used in the practice of self-mortification or as an instrument of chastisement in certain religious communities.
9.
a branch of instruction or learning:
the disciplines of history and economics.
verb (used with object), disciplined, disciplining.
10.
to train by instruction and exercise; drill.
11.
to bring to a state of order and obedience by training and control.
12.
to punish or penalize in order to train and control; correct; chastise.
Origin
1175-1225; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin disciplīna instruction, tuition, equivalent to discipul(us) disciple + -ina -ine2
Related forms
disciplinal
[dis-uh-pluh-nl, -plin-l, dis-uh-plahyn-l] /ˈdɪs ə plə nl, -ˌplɪn l, ˌdɪs əˈplaɪn l/ (Show IPA),
adjective
discipliner, noun
multidiscipline, noun
nondisciplining, adjective
overdiscipline, verb, overdisciplined, overdisciplining.
prediscipline, noun, verb (used with object), predisciplined, predisciplining.
rediscipline, verb (used with object), redisciplined, redisciplining.
subdiscipline, noun
Synonyms
3. chastisement, castigation. 12. See punish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for disciplined
  • In this respect it can provide a fresh disciplined scientific approach to many vexing questions.
  • Elite climbers are disciplined athletes who train constantly, repeating movements to perfection.
  • Last night max started attacking and my husband immediately disciplined him and took him in the next room.
  • She loves to play and has a high energy, but can be quiet and disciplined as well.
  • When done with structure those can actually become a disciplined job for the dog to feel a sense of accomplishment and pride.
  • Online coursework is largely self-paced, which means students need to be disciplined enough to set a schedule and stick to it.
  • Then again, he was obviously a disciplined, stoic fellow.
  • Art involves disciplined exploration as well as unstructured play.
  • To make a crude generalization, turks are disciplined but poorly integrated.
  • The uneducated people needed something they could understand, focus on and learn to be disciplined in.
British Dictionary definitions for disciplined

discipline

/ˈdɪsɪplɪn/
noun
1.
training or conditions imposed for the improvement of physical powers, self-control, etc
2.
systematic training in obedience to regulations and authority
3.
the state of improved behaviour, etc, resulting from such training or conditions
4.
punishment or chastisement
5.
a system of rules for behaviour, methods of practice, etc
6.
a branch of learning or instruction
7.
the laws governing members of a Church
8.
a scourge of knotted cords
verb (transitive)
9.
to improve or attempt to improve the behaviour, orderliness, etc, of by training, conditions, or rules
10.
to punish or correct
Derived Forms
disciplinable, adjective
disciplinal (ˌdɪsɪˈplaɪnəl; ˈdɪsɪˌplɪnəl) adjective
discipliner, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Latin disciplīna teaching, from discipulusdisciple
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for disciplined

discipline

n.

early 13c., "penitential chastisement; punishment," from Old French descepline (11c.) "discipline, physical punishment; teaching; suffering; martyrdom," and directly from Latin disciplina "instruction given, teaching, learning, knowledge," also "object of instruction, knowledge, science, military discipline," from discipulus (see disciple (n.)).

Sense of "treatment that corrects or punishes" is from notion of "order necessary for instruction." The Latin word is glossed in Old English by þeodscipe. Meaning "branch of instruction or education" is first recorded late 14c. Meaning "military training" is from late 15c.; that of "orderly conduct as a result of training" is from c.1500.

v.

c.1300; see discipline (n.). Related: Disciplined; disciplines; disciplining.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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