disclose

[dih-sklohz]
verb (used with object), disclosed, disclosing.
1.
to make known; reveal or uncover: to disclose a secret.
2.
to cause to appear; allow to be seen; lay open to view: In spring the violets disclose their fragrant petals.
3.
Obsolete. to open up; unfold.
noun
4.
Obsolete, disclosure.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English disclosen, desclosen < Old French desclos-, stem of desclore, equivalent to des- dis-1 + clore to close < Latin claudere; see close

discloser, noun
predisclose, verb (used with object), predisclosed, predisclosing.
self-disclosed, adjective
undisclosed, adjective


1. show, tell, unveil. See reveal. 2. expose.


1. conceal.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
disclose (dɪsˈkləʊz)
 
vb
1.  to make (information) known
2.  to allow to be seen; lay bare
 
dis'closer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disclose
late 14c., from O.Fr. desclos, pp. of desclore, from des- "dis-" + clore "to close" (see close (v.)). Related: Disclosed; disclosing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
I'd suggest posting this in the beta forums...you're not suppose to disclose
  that information here.
Politicians sometimes disclose sensitive information by mistake.
This law would allow journalists to refuse to disclose their confidential
  sources without facing the threat of fines or jail time.
Companies routinely disclose the compensation of their top executives.
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