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disparaging

[dih-spar-i-jing] /dɪˈspær ɪ dʒɪŋ/
adjective
1.
that disparages; tending to belittle or bring reproach upon:
disparaging remarks.
Origin
1635-1645
1635-45; disparage + -ing2
Related forms
disparagingly, adverb
nondisparaging, adjective
self-disparaging, adjective
Usage note
In this dictionary, the label disparaging indicates that a term or definition is used with a deliberate intent to disparage, as to belittle a particular racial, religious, or social group. It is often paired with the label Offensive, which describes a term that gives offense whether or not any offense was intended.

disparage

[dih-spar-ij] /dɪˈspær ɪdʒ/
verb (used with object), disparaged, disparaging.
1.
to speak of or treat slightingly; depreciate; belittle:
Do not disparage good manners.
2.
to bring reproach or discredit upon; lower the estimation of:
Your behavior will disparage the whole family.
Origin
1250-1300; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French desparag(i)er to match unequally, equivalent to des- dis-1 + -parag(i)er, derivative of parage equality, equivalent to par(er) to equalize (< Latin parāre; see peer1) + -age -age
Related forms
disparager, noun
undisparaged, adjective
Synonyms
1. ridicule, discredit, mock, demean, denounce, derogate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for disparaging
  • So they're trying to discourage the use of disparaging commentary in games.
  • Not a disparaging word about your current employer.
  • Every one of them thought his disparaging remarks were aimed at someone else.
  • This disparaging article puts forth some comments that are completely false.
  • Mechanics were being assailed by moralizers and convention-minded detractors authoring similar negative, disparaging connotations.
  • Federal trademark legislation prohibits the registration of disparaging symbols.
  • This article seems very biased and disparaging.
  • You are also automatically deemed a couple of other things, but "colorful" is the least disparaging.
  • Marks demands a public retraction regarding the disparaging comments about the copyright.
  • It has a disparaging significance over there, almost equal to that of our words organization and machine.
British Dictionary definitions for disparaging

disparage

/dɪˈspærɪdʒ/
verb (transitive)
1.
to speak contemptuously of; belittle
2.
to damage the reputation of
Derived Forms
disparagement, noun
disparager, noun
disparaging, adjective
disparagingly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Old French desparagier, from des-dis-1 + parage equality, from Latin par equal
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for disparaging

disparage

v.

early 14c., "degrade socially," from Old French desparagier (Modern French déparager) "reduce in rank, degrade, devalue, depreciate," originally "to marry unequally," and thus by extension the disgrace or dishonor involved in this, from des- "away" (see dis-) + parage "rank, lineage" (see peer (n.)). Sense of "belittle" first recorded 1530s. Related: Disparaged; disparaging; disparagingly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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