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distort

[dih-stawrt] /dɪˈstɔrt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to twist awry or out of shape; make crooked or deformed:
Arthritis had distorted his fingers.
2.
to give a false, perverted, or disproportionate meaning to; misrepresent:
to distort the facts.
3.
Electronics. to reproduce or amplify (a signal) inaccurately by changing the frequencies or unequally changing the delay or amplitude of the components of the output wave.
Origin
1580-1590
1580-90; < Latin distortus (past participle of distorquēre to distort), equivalent to dis- dis-1 + tor(qu)- (stem of torquēre to twist) + -tus past participle suffix
Related forms
distorter, noun
distortive, adjective
nondistorting, adjective
nondistortingly, adverb
nondistortive, adjective
overdistort, verb (used with object)
undistorting, adjective
Synonyms
2. pervert, misconstrue, twist, falsify, misstate. See misrepresent.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for distorting
  • But today, the subject is how a single new ingredient can renovate a traditional dish without distorting it.
  • No more distorting and divisive red and blue state maps.
  • But unhappily they have fallen into the error of distorting facts to suit general principles.
  • It's often quite humorous that educated enlightened individuals resort to distorting a law.
  • Life may be seen through many windows, none of them necessarily clear or opaque, less or more distorting than any of the others.
  • The austerity fad is also distorting politicians' priorities.
  • But this time politicians are not the only ones who blame financiers for distorting prices.
  • However, the government's distorting role in the economy will remain substantial despite such moves.
  • The combination of soaring oil prices and the tumbling dollar is distorting their economies and fuelling inflation.
  • For years, rich countries have been distorting world trade in garments with a complicated system of import quotas.
British Dictionary definitions for distorting

distort

/dɪˈstɔːt/
verb (transitive)
1.
(often passive) to twist or pull out of shape; make bent or misshapen; contort; deform
2.
to alter or misrepresent (facts, motives, etc)
3.
(electronics) to reproduce or amplify (a signal) inaccurately, changing the shape of the waveform
Derived Forms
distorted, adjective
distortedly, adverb
distortedness, noun
distorter, noun
distortive, adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Latin distortus misshapen, from distorquēre to turn different ways, from dis-1 + torquēre to twist
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for distorting

distort

v.

1580s, from Latin distortus, past participle of distorquere "to twist different ways, distort," from dis- "completely" + torquere "to twist" (see thwart). Related: Distorted; distorting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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