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Denotation vs. Connotation

disturbing

[dih-stur-bing] /dɪˈstɜr bɪŋ/
adjective
1.
upsetting or disquieting; dismaying:
a disturbing increase in the crime rate.
Origin of disturbing
1585-1595
1585-95; disturb + -ing2
Related forms
disturbingly, adverb
nondisturbing, adjective
undisturbing, adjective
undisturbingly, adverb

disturb

[dih-sturb] /dɪˈstɜrb/
verb (used with object)
1.
to interrupt the quiet, rest, peace, or order of; unsettle.
2.
to interfere with; interrupt; hinder:
Please do not disturb me when I'm working.
3.
to interfere with the arrangement, order, or harmony of; disarrange:
to disturb the papers on her desk.
4.
to perplex; trouble:
to be disturbed by strange behavior.
verb (used without object)
5.
to cause disturbance to someone's sleep, rest, etc.:
Do not disturb.
Origin
1175-1225; Middle English disto(u)rben, disturben < Anglo-French disto(u)rber, desturber < Latin disturbāre to demolish, upset, equivalent to dis- dis-1 + turbāre to confuse
Related forms
disturber, noun
predisturb, verb (used with object)
Synonyms
1. bother, annoy, trouble, pester.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for disturbing
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Such books, and France's "Isle of Penguins," are not disturbing as bed-books.

    Modern Essays John Macy
  • The sea-dragon cried: “Who is disturbing me here in my own kingdom?”

  • Their corpses, interspersed here and there in the series of the cells, are disturbing causes, which it is wise to eliminate.

    Bramble-bees and Others J. Henri Fabre
  • But his iron will prevented that suffering from disturbing the equanimity of his mind.

    The Snare Rafael Sabatini
  • More than that, he hoped that it never would come back, for it might be disturbing to his solitudes.

British Dictionary definitions for disturbing

disturbing

/dɪˈstɜːbɪŋ/
adjective
1.
tending to upset or agitate; troubling; worrying
Derived Forms
disturbingly, adverb

disturb

/dɪˈstɜːb/
verb (transitive)
1.
to intrude on; interrupt
2.
to destroy or interrupt the quietness or peace of
3.
to disarrange; muddle
4.
(often passive) to upset or agitate; trouble: I am disturbed at your bad news
5.
to inconvenience; put out: don't disturb yourself on my account
Derived Forms
disturber, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Latin disturbāre, from dis-1 + turbāre to confuse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for disturbing

disturb

v.

c.1300, "to stop or hinder," from Old French destorber (Old North French distourber) and directly from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid).

Meaning "to frighten" is late 13c.; that of "to stir up, agitate" is c.1300. Related: Disturbed; disturbing; disturbingly. Middle English also had distourbler (n.) "one who disturbs or incites" (late 14c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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