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disturbing

[dih-stur-bing] /dɪˈstɜr bɪŋ/
adjective
1.
upsetting or disquieting; dismaying:
a disturbing increase in the crime rate.
Origin
1585-1595
1585-95; disturb + -ing2
Related forms
disturbingly, adverb
nondisturbing, adjective
undisturbing, adjective
undisturbingly, adverb

disturb

[dih-sturb] /dɪˈstɜrb/
verb (used with object)
1.
to interrupt the quiet, rest, peace, or order of; unsettle.
2.
to interfere with; interrupt; hinder:
Please do not disturb me when I'm working.
3.
to interfere with the arrangement, order, or harmony of; disarrange:
to disturb the papers on her desk.
4.
to perplex; trouble:
to be disturbed by strange behavior.
verb (used without object)
5.
to cause disturbance to someone's sleep, rest, etc.:
Do not disturb.
Origin
1175-1225; Middle English disto(u)rben, disturben < Anglo-French disto(u)rber, desturber < Latin disturbāre to demolish, upset, equivalent to dis- dis-1 + turbāre to confuse
Related forms
disturber, noun
predisturb, verb (used with object)
Synonyms
1. bother, annoy, trouble, pester.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for disturbing
  • We can look through the observation window in the side and see what's going on without disturbing the bees.
  • To give interest to a garden without disturbing its serenity, vary textures.
  • It is a matter of absolute certainty that it is a disturbing element.
  • In the tops of the trees the wind began to play, disturbing the sleeping birds so that they flew about calling plaintively.
  • He can then start his day all by himself in the barnyard hours without disturbing any one, and in comfort to himself.
  • The effects on higher education are no surprise, but they are disturbing.
  • The implications for academic researchers are clear and disturbing.
  • Intentional or not, such practices send a disturbing message.
  • There is a disturbing lack of evidence presented by those disagreeing with the authors' hypotheses and conclusions.
  • Over the next few months, however, a disturbing trend started to emerge.
British Dictionary definitions for disturbing

disturbing

/dɪˈstɜːbɪŋ/
adjective
1.
tending to upset or agitate; troubling; worrying
Derived Forms
disturbingly, adverb

disturb

/dɪˈstɜːb/
verb (transitive)
1.
to intrude on; interrupt
2.
to destroy or interrupt the quietness or peace of
3.
to disarrange; muddle
4.
(often passive) to upset or agitate; trouble: I am disturbed at your bad news
5.
to inconvenience; put out: don't disturb yourself on my account
Derived Forms
disturber, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Latin disturbāre, from dis-1 + turbāre to confuse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for disturbing

disturb

v.

c.1300, "to stop or hinder," from Old French destorber (Old North French distourber) and directly from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid).

Meaning "to frighten" is late 13c.; that of "to stir up, agitate" is c.1300. Related: Disturbed; disturbing; disturbingly. Middle English also had distourbler (n.) "one who disturbs or incites" (late 14c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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