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disturbed

[dih-sturbd] /dɪˈstɜrbd/
adjective
1.
marked by symptoms of mental illness:
a disturbed personality.
2.
agitated or distressed; disrupted:
disturbed seas; a disturbed situation.
noun
3.
(used with a plural verb) persons who exhibit symptoms of neurosis or psychosis (usually preceded by the).
Origin
1585-1595
1585-95; disturb + -ed2
Related forms
undisturbed, adjective

disturb

[dih-sturb] /dɪˈstɜrb/
verb (used with object)
1.
to interrupt the quiet, rest, peace, or order of; unsettle.
2.
to interfere with; interrupt; hinder:
Please do not disturb me when I'm working.
3.
to interfere with the arrangement, order, or harmony of; disarrange:
to disturb the papers on her desk.
4.
to perplex; trouble:
to be disturbed by strange behavior.
verb (used without object)
5.
to cause disturbance to someone's sleep, rest, etc.:
Do not disturb.
Origin
1175-1225; Middle English disto(u)rben, disturben < Anglo-French disto(u)rber, desturber < Latin disturbāre to demolish, upset, equivalent to dis- dis-1 + turbāre to confuse
Related forms
disturber, noun
predisturb, verb (used with object)
Synonyms
1. bother, annoy, trouble, pester.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for disturbed
  • Scientists, not surprisingly, are disturbed by these developments.
  • No doubt you now understand why these linguistic mysteries have disturbed my sleep for the past couple of years.
  • Their forest habitat is being disturbed and destroyed in many places.
  • Long-lived but initially slow to grow, peonies sulk if disturbed.
  • As with a phone interview, you want to make sure you won't be disturbed.
  • We are also disturbed by a general unwillingness among faculty to grant that they may have a role in the high dropout rate.
  • In addition to being targets for lawful protests, college chiefs attract visits from angry or disturbed individuals.
  • Students could have been in the area, and in her disturbed state could have been targets as well.
  • Most of the guys who do these rampages are not overtly disturbed.
  • He hopes she won't be disturbed until she has brought off her goslings.
British Dictionary definitions for disturbed

disturbed

/dɪˈstɜːbd/
adjective
1.
(psychiatry) emotionally upset, troubled, or maladjusted

disturb

/dɪˈstɜːb/
verb (transitive)
1.
to intrude on; interrupt
2.
to destroy or interrupt the quietness or peace of
3.
to disarrange; muddle
4.
(often passive) to upset or agitate; trouble: I am disturbed at your bad news
5.
to inconvenience; put out: don't disturb yourself on my account
Derived Forms
disturber, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Latin disturbāre, from dis-1 + turbāre to confuse
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for disturbed
adj.

past participle adjective from disturb. Meaning "emotionally or mentally unstable" is from 1904.

disturb

v.

c.1300, "to stop or hinder," from Old French destorber (Old North French distourber) and directly from Latin disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" (see dis-) + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil" (see turbid).

Meaning "to frighten" is late 13c.; that of "to stir up, agitate" is c.1300. Related: Disturbed; disturbing; disturbingly. Middle English also had distourbler (n.) "one who disturbs or incites" (late 14c.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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