dogmatism

[dawg-muh-tiz-uhm, dog-]
noun
dogmatic character; unfounded positiveness in matters of opinion; arrogant assertion of opinions as truths.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Late Latin dogmatismus, equivalent to Latin dogmat(icus) dogmatic + -ismus -ism; replacing dogmatisme < French

antidogmatism, noun
overdogmatism, noun
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World English Dictionary
dogmatize or dogmatise (ˈdɒɡməˌtaɪz)
 
vb
to say or state (something) in a dogmatic manner
 
dogmatise or dogmatise
 
vb
 
'dogmatism or dogmatise
 
n
 
dogmati'zation or dogmatise
 
n
 
dogmati'sation or dogmatise
 
n
 
'dogmatizer or dogmatise
 
n
 
'dogmatiser or dogmatise
 
n

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dogmatism
c.1600, but not in common use until 19c., from Fr. dogmatisme (16c.), from M.L. dogmatismus, from L. dogma (see dogma).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Scientific dogmatism is no more commendable than any other.
The nationalists' linguistic dogmatism is provoking a backlash.
His chief targets are ideological dogmatism and imperialist hubris.
If they are judicious they will fault our dogmatism.
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