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dread

[dred] /drɛd/
verb (used with object)
1.
to fear greatly; be in extreme apprehension of:
to dread death.
2.
to be reluctant to do, meet, or experience:
I dread going to big parties.
3.
Archaic. to hold in respectful awe.
verb (used without object)
4.
to be in great fear.
noun
5.
terror or apprehension as to something in the future; great fear.
6.
a person or thing dreaded.
7.
dreads, Informal. dreadlocks.
8.
Informal. a person who wears dreadlocks.
9.
Archaic. deep awe or reverence.
adjective
10.
greatly feared; frightful; terrible.
11.
held in awe or reverential fear.
Origin
1125-1175
1125-75; Middle English dreden (v.), Old English drǣdan, aphetic variant of adrǣdan, ondrǣdan; cognate with Old High German intrātan to fear
Related forms
dreadable, adjective
dreadness, noun
predread, noun, verb (used with object)
undreaded, adjective
undreading, adjective
Synonyms
5. See fear. 10. dire, dreadful, horrible.
Antonyms
1. welcome.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for dreaded
  • Always spin your weakness into something positive if they ask that dreaded question about your weakness.
  • They dreaded a university that might become a cacophony of demanding voices instead of a chorus of learning and scholarship.
  • The dreaded exams played a major role in grad student culture.
  • There is, of course, the dreaded pop quiz way of making students read.
  • The dreaded security lines will get a little shorter for some frequent fliers and those willing to pay.
  • Water is less dreaded than fire, yet fewer suffer by fire than by water.
  • It was as he had dreaded-there was a struggle coming.
  • To them it seemed that the gifts of an enemy were to be dreaded.
  • It was plain enough to discern, that the old fellows dreaded some such discourtesy at my hands.
  • He completely succeeded in preserving me from the sort of influences he so much dreaded.
British Dictionary definitions for dreaded

dread

/drɛd/
verb (transitive)
1.
to anticipate with apprehension or terror
2.
to fear greatly
3.
(archaic) to be in awe of
noun
4.
great fear; horror
5.
an object of terror
6.
(slang) a Rastafarian
7.
(archaic) deep reverence
adjective
8.
(literary) awesome; awe-inspiring
Word Origin
Old English ondrǣdan; related to Old Saxon antdrādan, Old High German intrātan
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for dreaded

dread

v.

late 12c., a shortening of Old English adrædan, contraction of ondrædan "counsel or advise against," also "to dread, fear, be afraid," from on- "against" + rædan "to advise" (see read (v.)). Cognate of Old Saxon andradon, Old High German intraten. Related: Dreaded; dreading. As a noun from 12c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for dreaded

dread

a fundamental category of existentialism. According to the 19th-century philosopher Soren Kierkegaard, dread, or angst, is a desire for what one fears and is central to his conception of original sin. For the 20th-century German philosopher Martin Heidegger, anxiety is one of the distinctive ways through which Dasein (the historical person) is disclosed as a contingent being, and thus anxiety is that through which fear first becomes possible

Learn more about dread with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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