dreadful

[dred-fuhl]
adjective
1.
causing great dread, fear, or terror; terrible: a dreadful storm.
2.
inspiring awe or reverence.
3.
extremely bad, unpleasant, or ugly: dreadful cooking; a dreadful hat.
noun British.
5.
a periodical given to highly sensational matter.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English dredful. See dread, -ful

dreadfulness, noun
quasi-dreadful, adjective
quasi-dreadfully, adverb


1. frightful, dire.
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World English Dictionary
dreadful (ˈdrɛdfʊl)
 
adj
1.  extremely disagreeable, shocking, or bad: what a dreadful play
2.  (intensifier): this is a dreadful waste of time
3.  causing dread; terrifying
4.  archaic inspiring awe
 
'dreadfulness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

dreadful
early 13c., "full of dread," from dread + -ful. Meaning "causing dread" is from mid-13c.; weakened sense of "very bad" is from mid-18c. Related: Dreadfully.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Alert readers may have noticed something about that chant: it's dreadful.
The post has appeared elsewhere online, so it's not some dreadful secret.
Since when people are threatened by so many dreadful viruses that cause fatal
  disease.
Dry coriander seed doesn't set me off but the fresh leaves are dreadful.
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