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drowsy

[drou-zee] /ˈdraʊ zi/
adjective, drowsier, drowsiest.
1.
half-asleep; sleepy.
2.
marked by or resulting from sleepiness.
3.
dull; sluggish.
4.
inducing lethargy or sleepiness:
drowsy spring weather.
Origin
1520-1530
1520-30; drowse + -y1
Related forms
drowsily, adverb
drowsiness, noun
Synonyms
1. somnolent, dozy. 3. lethargic, listless.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for drowsy
  • Add to that the fact that while stoned many people become drowsy and sleepy.
  • It is not this mechanism, however, that makes people drowsy and starts them on the somnolent slide.
  • In the drowsy afternoons she played the piano in the inn's empty salon.
  • Marijuana and its concentrated form, hashish, make you drowsy.
  • drowsy driving increased the driver's risk of a crash or near-crash by four times to six times, the study said.
  • Freddy's teenage victims may be afraid to fall asleep, but that doesn't mean cast members should deliver drowsy performances.
  • Science might soon serve up the ultimate sugary snack for drowsy cops and late-night truckers: a caffeinated doughnut.
  • Not all of them make you drowsy or for some, the drowsiness decrease the longer you take it.
  • The scene in the vines is one of drowsy, familial contentment.
  • After all, many driving fatalities are the result of drowsy driving.
British Dictionary definitions for drowsy

drowsy

/ˈdraʊzɪ/
adjective drowsier, drowsiest
1.
heavy with sleepiness; sleepy
2.
inducing sleep; soporific
3.
sluggish or lethargic; dull
Derived Forms
drowsily, adverb
drowsiness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for drowsy
adj.

1520s, probably ultimately from Old English drusan, drusian "sink," also "become languid, slow, or inactive" (related to dreosan "to fall"), from Proto-Germanic *drus- (see dreary). But there is no record of it in Middle English. Related: Drowsily; drowsiness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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