earful

[eer-fool]
noun, plural earfuls.
1.
an outpouring of oral information or advice, especially when given without solicitation.
2.
a sharp verbal rebuke; a scolding.

Origin:
1915–20; ear1 + -ful


See -ful.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To earful
Collins
World English Dictionary
earful (ˈɪəfʊl)
 
n
1.  something heard or overheard
2.  a rebuke or scolding, esp a lengthy or severe one

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

earful
"a piece of one's mind," 1917, from ear (1) + -ful.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
You'll get an earful from the lively counter help about how lobster meat
  deserves better than a hot dog bun.
Occasionally they get an earful from an offended viewer.
And the boys gave us an earful because we'd committed a grievous sin.
Then, develop some parent-tested strategies for soothing your little tearful
  earful.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature