emaciated

[ih-mey-shee-ey-tid]
adjective
marked by emaciation.

Origin:
1655–65; emaciate + -ed2

unemaciated, adjective


thin, wasted, puny, gaunt, haggard, scrawny.
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emaciate

[ih-mey-shee-eyt]
verb (used with object), emaciated, emaciating.
to make abnormally lean or thin by a gradual wasting away of flesh.

Origin:
1640–50; < Latin ēmaciātus, wasted away, equivalent to ē- e-1 + maciātus, past participle of maciāre to produce leanness (maci(ēs) leanness + -ātus -ate1)

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
emaciate (ɪˈmeɪsɪˌeɪt)
 
vb
(usually tr) to become or cause to become abnormally thin
 
[C17: from Latin ēmaciāre to make lean, from macer thin]
 
emaci'ation
 
n

emaciated (ɪˈmeɪsɪˌeɪtɪd)
 
adj
abnormally thin

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

emaciate
1640s, from L. emaciatus, pp. of emaciare "make lean, waste away," from ex- "out" + macies "leanness," from macer "thin" (see macro-).

emaciated
1660s, pp. adj. from emaciate.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Those young emaciated boys need a good meal and a haircut.
The last time I looked, the sharks looked a bit emaciated.
This week we implore you to deliver a visual feast to our emaciated eyes.
Many of the rescued dogs that I have known have been slender-to-emaciated due
  to malnutrition before the rescue.
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