embodiment

[em-bod-ee-muhnt]
noun
1.
the act of embodying.
2.
the state or fact of being embodied.
3.
a person, being, or thing embodying a spirit, principle, abstraction, etc; incarnation.
4.
something embodied.

Origin:
1820–30; embody + -ment

preembodiment, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To embodiment
Collins
World English Dictionary
embody (ɪmˈbɒdɪ)
 
vb , -bodies, -bodying, -bodied
1.  to give a tangible, bodily, or concrete form to (an abstract concept)
2.  to be an example of or express (an idea, principle, etc), esp in action: his gentleness embodies a Christian ideal
3.  (often foll by in) to collect or unite in a comprehensive whole, system, etc; comprise; include: all the different essays were embodied in one long article
4.  to invest (a spiritual entity) with a body or with bodily form; render incarnate
 
em'bodiment
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

embodiment
1828, from embody + -ment.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Though the embodiment of patriotism, he was no right-winger.
The use of conservation technologies and the sales of recycled content
  represent the embodiment of environmental responsibility.
She is a perfect embodiment of the right's anti-science, anti-intellectual,
  mystical world view.
She was the embodiment of a bygone and more romantic nautical era.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature