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encase

[en-keys] /ɛnˈkeɪs/
verb (used with object), encased, encasing.
1.
to enclose in or as in a case:
We encased the ancient vase in glass to preserve it.
Also, incase.
Origin
1625-1635
1625-35; en-1 + case2
Can be confused
encase, in case.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for encase
  • Contrary to popular belief, not all armadillos are able to encase themselves in their shells.
  • Then the shell starts to develop as the ribs fuse together and encase the shoulder blades.
  • They slowly encase themselves in an epistemic cocoon.
  • She used it to literally encase or trap layers of cream pleated dresses, creating a single garment.
  • In less than a minute they can create and encase themselves in a new cyst and drop to the bottom to await more prey.
  • If this is not possible, encase pipe in a second pipe with a minimum of joints.
  • The leaf will roll up around the insect to encase it.
  • It is proposed to encase sidewalk tree with a wooden flower box and install a slate and concrete chess table.
  • If this is not possible, encase pipe in a second pipe with a minimum of joints and provide drip pans under all piping.
British Dictionary definitions for encase

encase

/ɪnˈkeɪs/
verb
1.
(transitive) to place or enclose in or as if in a case
Derived Forms
encasement, incasement, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for encase
v.

1630s, from en- (1) "make, put in" + case (n.2). Related: Encased; encasing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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