Dictionary.com Unabridged

enchant

[en-chant, -chahnt]
verb (used with object)
1.
to subject to magical influence; bewitch: fairytales about witches who enchant handsome princes and beautiful maidens.
2.
to delight to a high degree: Her gaiety and wit have enchanted us all.
3.
to impart a magic quality or effect to.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Anglo-French, Middle French enchanter < Latin incantāre to put a spell on; see incantation

unenchanted, adjective


2. fascinate, attract; captivate, enrapture.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To enchanting
Collins
World English Dictionary
enchant (ɪnˈtʃɑːnt)
 
vb
1.  to cast a spell on; bewitch
2.  to delight or captivate utterly; fascinate; charm
 
[C14: from Old French enchanter, from Latin incantāre to chant a spell, from cantāre to chant, from canere to sing]
 
en'chanter
 
n
 
en'chantress
 
fem n

enchanting (ɪnˈtʃɑːntɪŋ)
 
adj
pleasant; delightful
 
en'chantingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

enchant
late 14c., lit. and fig., from Fr. enchanter, from L. incantare (see enchantment). Related: Enchanting. Enchanted in weakened sense of "delighted" is from 1590s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
It isn't often nowadays that a ballet production can be described as enchanting.
It was an enchanting visit with superb accommodations.
Create an enchanting retreat in a corner of your yard with an outdoor
  chandelier you can make in an hour.
Because you can now stare at your own enchanting visage, you'll get perfect
  framing and focusing every time.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;