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endive

[en-dahyv, ahn-deev; French ahn-deev] /ˈɛn daɪv, ˈɑn div; French ɑ̃ˈdiv/
noun, plural endives
[en-dahyvz, ahn-deevz; French ahn-deev] /ˈɛn daɪvz, ˈɑn divz; French ɑ̃ˈdiv/ (Show IPA)
1.
a composite plant, Cichorium endivia, having a rosette of often curly-edged leaves used in salads.
Compare escarole.
2.
Also called Belgian endive, French endive, witloof. a young chicory plant, deprived of light to form a narrow head of whitish leaves that are eaten as a cooked vegetable or used raw in salads.
3.
Furniture. an ornamental motif having the form of an arrangement of acanthus or endive leaves.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English < Middle FrenchMedieval Greek entýbia, plural of entýbion, derivative of earlier éntybon < Latin intubum, intibum, earlier intubus chicory, endive, perhaps < Semitic
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for endive
  • Put that over crostini, use endive leaves, pita chips whatever you want.
  • These steaks would be great served with the endive salad.
  • Place the endive in a buttered baking dish and add the butter, chicken stock, salt and pepper.
  • Cooked endive, an unlikely comfort food, is wonderful with walnuts.
  • Long-lasting endive makes this a forgiving dish for busy cooks with unpredictable schedules.
British Dictionary definitions for endive

endive

/ˈɛndaɪv/
noun
1.
a plant, Cichorium endivia, cultivated for its crisp curly leaves, which are used in salads: family Asteraceae (composites) Compare chicory
Word Origin
C15: from Old French, from Medieval Latin endīvia, variant of Latin intubus, entubus, of uncertain origin
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for endive
n.

late 14c., from Old French endive, from Medieval Latin endiva or Late Latin intibus, perhaps from Medieval Greek entybon (though OED considers this a borrowing from Latin), which is perhaps of Eastern origin (perhaps from Egyptian tybi "January," which is when the plant grows in Egypt).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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