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engaging

[en-gey-jing] /ɛnˈgeɪ dʒɪŋ/
adjective
1.
winning; attractive; pleasing:
an engaging smile.
Origin
1665-1675
1665-75; engage + -ing2
Related forms
engagingly, adverb
engagingness, noun
quasi-engaging, adjective
quasi-engagingly, adverb
unengaging, adjective
Synonyms
charming, agreeable.

engage

[en-geyj] /ɛnˈgeɪdʒ/
verb (used with object), engaged, engaging.
1.
to occupy the attention or efforts of (a person or persons):
He engaged her in conversation.
2.
to secure for aid, employment, use, etc.; hire:
to engage a worker; to engage a room.
3.
to attract and hold fast:
The novel engaged her attention and interest.
4.
to attract or please:
His good nature engages everyone.
5.
to bind, as by pledge, promise, contract, or oath; make liable:
He engaged himself to repay his debt within a month.
6.
to betroth (usually used in the passive):
They were engaged last week.
7.
to bring (troops) into conflict; enter into conflict with:
Our army engaged the enemy.
8.
Mechanics. to cause (gears or the like) to become interlocked; interlock with.
9.
to attach or secure.
10.
Obsolete. to entangle or involve.
verb (used without object), engaged, engaging.
11.
to occupy oneself; become involved:
to engage in business or politics.
12.
to take employment:
She engaged in her mother's business.
13.
to pledge one's word; assume an obligation:
I was unwilling to engage on such terms.
14.
to cross weapons; enter into conflict:
The armies engaged early in the morning.
15.
Mechanics. (of gears or the like) to interlock.
Origin
1515-25; < Middle French engager, Old French engagier. See en-1, gage1
Related forms
engager, noun
Synonyms
1. absorb, engross, interest, involve.
Antonyms
2. discharge. 8. release.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for engaging
  • Students enroll in an online program with self-paced media and engaging courses.
  • The color captured in the picture and its arrangement was eye engaging.
  • We typically seek projects engaging one or more big questions lying within and at the intersection of multiple disciplines.
  • Sometimes claymation is used to create engaging and detailed characters who seem, in some ways, more alive than living creatures.
  • It also survives as a model of logical thought, and a vibrant and engaging work of literature.
  • engaging those pressured faculty members can be a challenge when a crisis hits.
  • Learn facts about the natural world while you play this engaging photo-hunt game.
  • Inspire kids with educational videos about animals and geography, and with engaging games and toys.
  • Worse, they think nothing of engaging in actual manual labour in their pursuit of knowledge.
  • There were also sessions on designing a syllabus, creating engaging learning environments, and mentoring students of color.
British Dictionary definitions for engaging

engaging

/ɪnˈɡeɪdʒɪŋ/
adjective
1.
pleasing, charming, or winning
Derived Forms
engagingly, adverb
engagingness, noun

engage

/ɪnˈɡeɪdʒ/
verb (mainly transitive)
1.
to secure the services of; employ
2.
to secure for use; reserve engage a room
3.
to involve (a person or his attention) intensely; engross; occupy
4.
to attract (the affection) of (a person) her innocence engaged him
5.
to draw (somebody) into conversation
6.
(intransitive) to take part; participate he engages in many sports
7.
to promise (to do something)
8.
(also intransitive) (military) to begin an action with (an enemy)
9.
to bring (a mechanism) into operation he engaged the clutch
10.
(also intransitive) to undergo or cause to undergo interlocking, as of the components of a driving mechanism, such as a gear train
11.
(machinery) to locate (a locking device) in its operative position or to advance (a tool) into a workpiece to commence cutting
Derived Forms
engager, noun
Word Origin
C15: from Old French engagier, from en-1 + gage a pledge, see gage1

engagé

/ɑ̃ɡaʒe/
adjective
1.
(of a writer or artist, esp a man) morally or politically committed to some ideology
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for engaging
adj.

"interesting," 1650s (implied in engagingly), present participle adjective from engage.

engage

v.

early 15c., "to pledge," from Middle French engagier, from Old French en gage "under pledge," from en "make" + gage "pledge," through Frankish from Proto-Germanic *wadiare "pledge" (see wed).

It shows the common evolution of Germanic -w- to French -g-; cf. Guillaume from Wilhelm). Meaning "attract the attention of" is from 1640s; that of "employ" is from 1640s, from notion of "binding as by a pledge." Specific sense of "promise to marry" is 1610s (implied in engaged).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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