enrage

[en-reyj]
verb (used with object), enraged, enraging.
to make extremely angry; put into a rage; infuriate: His supercilious attitude enraged me.

Origin:
1490–1500; < Middle French enrager. See en-1, rage

enragedly [en-rey-jid-lee, -reyjd-] , adverb
enragement, noun


anger, inflame, madden. Enrage, incense, infuriate imply stirring to violent anger. To enrage or to infuriate is to provoke wrath: They enrage (infuriate ) him by their deliberate and continual injustice. To incense is to inflame with indignation or anger: to incense a person by making insulting remarks.


appease, pacify.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
enrage (ɪnˈreɪdʒ)
 
vb
(tr) to provoke to fury; put into a rage; anger
 
en'raged
 
adj
 
enragedly
 
adv
 
en'ragement
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

enrage
late 14c., from O.Fr. enrager, from en- "make, put in" + rage "rabies, rage" (see rage). Related: Enraged; enraging.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Nor was there in the question put by the clergyman anything likely to enrage
  him.
May further enrage colleague, but your clear, calm response will not get you
  into trouble.
Whether fancy or skunked, words that enrage or distract will get in the way of
  the message.
When you obsess over and enrage yourselves over such things, you create an ugly
  work environment.
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