enthymeme

[en-thuh-meem]
noun Logic.
a syllogism or other argument in which a premise or the conclusion is unexpressed.

Origin:
1580–90; < Latin enthȳmēma < Greek enthȳ́mēma thought, argument, equivalent to enthȳmē-, variant stem of enthȳmeîsthai to ponder (en- en-2 + -thȳmeîsthai verbal derivative of thȳmós spirit, thought) + -ma noun suffix of result

enthymematic [en-thuh-mee-mat-ik] , adjective
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World English Dictionary
enthymeme (ˈɛnθɪˌmiːm)
 
n
1.  an incomplete syllogism, in which one or more premises are unexpressed as their truth is considered to be self-evident
2.  any argument some of whose premises are omitted as obvious
 
[C16: via Latin from Greek enthumēma, from enthumeisthai to infer (literally: to have in the mind), from en-² + thumos mind]
 
enthyme'matic
 
adj
 
enthyme'matical
 
adj

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

enthymeme
1580s, from L. enthymema, from Gk. enthymema, from enthymesthai to think, consider, from en- in + thymos mind.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

enthymeme

in syllogistic, or traditional, logic, name of a syllogistic argument that is incompletely stated. In the argument "All insects have six legs; therefore, all wasps have six legs," the minor premise, "All wasps are insects," is suppressed. Any one of the propositions may be omitted-even the conclusion; but in general it is the one that comes most naturally to the mind. Often in rhetorical language the deliberate omission of one of the propositions has a dramatic effect. This use of the word differs from Aristotle's original application of it (in his Prior Analytics, ii, 27) to a rhetorical syllogism (employed for persuasion instead of instruction) based on "probabilities or signs"; i.e., on propositions that are generally valid or on particular facts that may be held to justify a general principle or another particular fact.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Contends that music without lyrics can serve as an argument by functioning as a form of enthymeme.
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