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exaggerated

[ig-zaj-uh-rey-tid] /ɪgˈzædʒ əˌreɪ tɪd/
adjective
1.
unduly or unrealistically magnified:
to have an exaggerated opinion of oneself.
2.
abnormally increased or enlarged.
Origin
1545-1555
1545-55; exaggerate + -ed2
Related forms
exaggeratedly, adverb
nonexaggerated, adjective
nonexaggeratedly, adverb
self-exaggerated, adjective
unexaggerated, adjective

exaggerate

[ig-zaj-uh-reyt] /ɪgˈzædʒ əˌreɪt/
verb (used with object), exaggerated, exaggerating.
1.
to magnify beyond the limits of truth; overstate; represent disproportionately:
to exaggerate the difficulties of a situation.
2.
to increase or enlarge abnormally:
Those shoes exaggerate the size of my feet.
verb (used without object), exaggerated, exaggerating.
3.
to employ exaggeration, as in speech or writing:
a person who is always exaggerating.
Origin
1525-35; < Latin exaggerātus (past participle of exaggerāre heap up), equivalent to ex- ex-1 + agger heap + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
exaggeratingly, adverb
exaggerator, noun
nonexaggerating, adjective
overexaggerate, verb, overexaggerated, overexaggerating.
unexaggerating, adjective
Synonyms
1. embellish, amplify, embroider. 2. inflate.
Antonyms
1. minimize.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for exaggerated
  • But a new report from an independent government watchdog group suggests that those claims are exaggerated.
  • Until recently the deficit-cutting rhetoric exaggerated its likely short-term impact.
  • The climate-match maps are similarly exaggerated for the seven of the eight species that are provided maps.
  • Trial researcher alleges paper exaggerated antidepressant benefits.
  • It is a type of physiologic or exaggerated physiologic jaundice.
  • exaggerated self-interest is considered to be a sign of social immaturity.
  • The lobster likely uses its exaggerated claw, or cheliped, to defend against other crustaceans.
  • Predictions of traditional media's demise are greatly exaggerated.
  • Breeding for exaggerated qualities may well bring an end to the breed.
  • The economic impact of bouts of severe weather is easily exaggerated.
British Dictionary definitions for exaggerated

exaggerate

/ɪɡˈzædʒəˌreɪt/
verb
1.
to regard or represent as larger or greater, more important or more successful, etc, than is true
2.
(transitive) to make greater, more noticeable, etc, than usual: his new clothes exaggerated his awkwardness
Derived Forms
exaggeratingly, adverb
exaggeration, noun
exaggerative, exaggeratory, adjective
exaggerator, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin exaggerāre to magnify, from aggerāre to heap, from agger heap

exaggerated

/ɪɡˈzædʒəˌreɪtɪd/
adjective
1.
unduly or excessively magnified; enlarged beyond truth or reasonableness
2.
(pathol) abnormally enlarged: an exaggerated spleen
Derived Forms
exaggeratedly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for exaggerated

exaggerate

v.

1530s, "to pile up, accumulate," from Latin exaggeratus, past participle of exaggerare "heighten, amplify, magnify," literally "to heap, pile, load, fill," from ex- "thoroughly" (see ex-) + aggerare "heap up," from agger (genitive aggeris) "heap," from aggerere "bring together, carry toward," from ad- "to, toward" + gerere "carry" (see gest). Sense of "overstate" first recorded in English 1560s. Related: Exaggerated; exaggerating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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