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exceeding

[ik-see-ding] /ɪkˈsi dɪŋ/
adjective
1.
extraordinary; exceptional.
adverb
2.
Archaic. exceedingly.
Origin of exceeding
1485-1495
1485-95; exceed + -ing2

exceed

[ik-seed] /ɪkˈsid/
verb (used with object)
1.
to go beyond in quantity, degree, rate, etc.:
to exceed the speed limit.
2.
to go beyond the bounds or limits of:
to exceed one's understanding.
3.
to surpass; be superior to; excel:
Her performance exceeded all the others.
verb (used without object)
4.
to be greater, as in quantity or degree.
5.
to surpass others; excel or be superior.
Origin
1325-75; Middle English exceden < Latin excēdere to go out or beyond. See ex-1, cede
Related forms
exceedable, adjective
exceeder, noun
superexceed, verb (used without object)
unexceedable, adjective
unexceeded, adjective
Can be confused
accede, concede, exceed.
Synonyms
2. overstep, transcend. 3. outdo, outstrip, beat, cap, top.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for exceeding
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • A thrill of pain went through her heart, tempering her exceeding joy in her new-found happiness.

    The Shadow Witch Gertrude Crownfield
  • The spines are rather short, not exceeding a quarter of an inch.

  • The numbers of such representatives is previously determined, always not exceeding one-fifth of the total number of each grade.

    A Fantasy of Far Japan Baron Kencho Suyematsu
  • Harry greeted him with exceeding cordiality and a fine blush.

  • His manner was subdued and gentle, and on his homely face was a look of exceeding peace.

    Reels and Spindles Evelyn Raymond
British Dictionary definitions for exceeding

exceeding

/ɪkˈsiːdɪŋ/
adjective
1.
very great; exceptional or excessive
adverb
2.
an archaic word for exceedingly

exceed

/ɪkˈsiːd/
verb
1.
to be superior to (a person or thing), esp in size or quality; excel
2.
(transitive) to go beyond the limit or bounds of: to exceed one's income, exceed a speed limit
3.
to be greater in degree or quantity than (a person or thing)
Derived Forms
exceedable, adjective
exceeder, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Latin excēdere to go beyond, from cēdere to go
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for exceeding

exceed

v.

late 14c., from Old French exceder (14c.) "exceed, surpass, go too far," from Latin excedere "depart, go beyond, be in excess, surpass," from ex- "out" (see ex-) + cedere "go, yield" (see cede).

Related: Exceeded; exceeding. Exceedingly (late 15c.) means "very greatly or very much;" excessively (mid-15c.) means "too greatly or too much."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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