exposure

[ik-spoh-zher]
noun
1.
the act of exposing.
2.
the fact or state of being exposed.
3.
disclosure, as of something private or secret: the exposure of their invasion plans.
4.
an act or instance of revealing or unmasking, as an impostor, crime, or fraud: the exposure of graft and corruption.
5.
presentation to view, especially in an open or public manner: His exposure of his anger shocked the company.
6.
a laying open or subjecting to the action or influence of something: exposure to the measles; The exposure of his theories to ridicule destroyed his self-confidence.
7.
the condition of being exposed without protection to the effects of harsh weather, especially the cold: to suffer from exposure.
8.
Photography.
a.
the act of presenting a photosensitive surface to rays of light.
b.
the total amount of light received by a photosensitive surface or an area of such a surface, expressed as the product of the degree of illumination and the period of illumination.
c.
the image resulting from the effects of light rays on a photosensitive surface.
9.
situation with regard to sunlight or wind; aspect: a southern exposure.
10.
a putting out or deserting, especially of a child, without shelter or protection; abandonment.
11.
something exposed, as to view; an exposed surface: exposures of rock.
12.
public appearance, especially on the mass media.
13.
a prominent, often overextended position or commitment, as in investment, that is considered precarious and risky: The bank was nervous about its exposure in Iran.

Origin:
1595–1605; expose + -ure

nonexposure, noun
postexposure, adjective
reexposure, noun
self-exposure, noun
semiexposure, noun


3. divulgement, revelation, exposé. 5. display.


1. concealment.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
exposure (ɪkˈspəʊʒə)
 
n
1.  the act of exposing or the condition of being exposed
2.  the position or outlook of a house, building, etc; aspect: the bedroom has a southern exposure
3.  lack of shelter from the weather, esp the cold: to die of exposure
4.  a surface that is exposed: an exposure of granite
5.  mountaineering See exposed the degree to which a climb, etc is exposed
6.  photog
 a.  the act of exposing a photographic film or plate to light, X-rays, etc
 b.  an area on a film or plate that has been exposed to light, etc
 c.  (as modifier): exposure control
7.  photog
 a.  the intensity of light falling on a photographic film or plate multiplied by the time for which it is exposed
 b.  a combination of lens aperture and shutter speed used in taking a photograph: he used the wrong exposure
8.  appearance or presentation before the public, as in a theatre, on television, or in films
9.  See indecent exposure

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

exposure
c.1600, "public exhibition," from expose (v.) + -ure. Sense of "situation with regard to sun or weather" is from 1660s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Avoiding danger is no safer in the long run than outright exposure.
So far, there is no evidence that exposure to any of these gadgets causes
  long-term developmental problems, experts say.
Specifically, white scientists have much better exposure to mentoring and more
  opportunities for research collaboration.
The more they spread themselves operationally, the more natural hedges reduce
  their exposure to big currency swings.
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