facetted

facet

[fas-it]
noun
1.
one of the small, polished plane surfaces of a cut gem.
2.
a similar surface cut on a fragment of rock by the action of water, windblown sand, etc.
3.
aspect; phase: They carefully examined every facet of the argument.
4.
Architecture. any of the faces of a column cut in a polygonal form.
5.
Zoology. one of the corneal lenses of a compound arthropod eye.
6.
Anatomy. a small, smooth, flat area on a hard surface, especially on a bone.
7.
Dentistry. a small, highly burnished area, usually on the enamel surface of a tooth, produced by abrasion between opposing teeth in chewing.
verb (used with object), faceted, faceting or (especially British) facetted, facetting.
8.
to cut facets on.

Origin:
1615–25; < French facette little face. See face, -et

unfaceted, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
facet (ˈfæsɪt)
 
n
1.  any of the surfaces of a cut gemstone
2.  an aspect or phase, as of a subject or personality
3.  architect the raised surface between the flutes of a column
4.  any of the lenses that make up the compound eye of an insect or other arthropod
5.  anatomy any small smooth area on a hard surface, as on a bone
 
vb , -ets, -eting, -eted, -ets, -etting, -etted
6.  (tr) to cut facets in (a gemstone)
 
[C17: from French facette a little face]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

facet
1620s, from Fr. facette, from O.Fr., dim. of face (see face). The diamond-cutting sense is the original one. Related: Faceted; facets.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

facet fac·et (fās'ĭt)
n.

  1. A small smooth area on a bone or other firm structure.

  2. A worn spot on a tooth, produced by chewing or grinding.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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