facet

[fas-it]
noun
1.
one of the small, polished plane surfaces of a cut gem.
2.
a similar surface cut on a fragment of rock by the action of water, windblown sand, etc.
3.
aspect; phase: They carefully examined every facet of the argument.
4.
Architecture. any of the faces of a column cut in a polygonal form.
5.
Zoology. one of the corneal lenses of a compound arthropod eye.
6.
Anatomy. a small, smooth, flat area on a hard surface, especially on a bone.
7.
Dentistry. a small, highly burnished area, usually on the enamel surface of a tooth, produced by abrasion between opposing teeth in chewing.
verb (used with object), faceted, faceting or (especially British) facetted, facetting.
8.
to cut facets on.

Origin:
1615–25; < French facette little face. See face, -et

unfaceted, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
facet (ˈfæsɪt)
 
n
1.  any of the surfaces of a cut gemstone
2.  an aspect or phase, as of a subject or personality
3.  architect the raised surface between the flutes of a column
4.  any of the lenses that make up the compound eye of an insect or other arthropod
5.  anatomy any small smooth area on a hard surface, as on a bone
 
vb , -ets, -eting, -eted, -ets, -etting, -etted
6.  (tr) to cut facets in (a gemstone)
 
[C17: from French facette a little face]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

facet
1620s, from Fr. facette, from O.Fr., dim. of face (see face). The diamond-cutting sense is the original one. Related: Faceted; facets.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

facet fac·et (fās'ĭt)
n.

  1. A small smooth area on a bone or other firm structure.

  2. A worn spot on a tooth, produced by chewing or grinding.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
It is a bit rough on the top and faceted clear on the sides the bottom is polished flat opaque.
Its floor is covered in crystalline, perfectly faceted blocks.
The faceted cloak isn't as good as a smooth one but it's not bad either.
The novel is a perfectly faceted diamond, clear in its icy progression.
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