falsify

[fawl-suh-fahy]
verb (used with object), falsified, falsifying.
1.
to make false or incorrect, especially so as to deceive: to falsify income-tax reports.
2.
to alter fraudulently.
3.
to represent falsely: He falsified the history of his family to conceal his humble origins.
4.
to show or prove to be false; disprove: to falsify a theory.
verb (used without object), falsified, falsifying.
5.
to make false statements.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English falsifien < Middle French falsifier < Late Latin falsificāre. See false, -ify

falsifiable, adjective
falsifiability, noun
falsification [fawl-suh-fi-key-shuhn] , noun
falsifier, noun
nonfalsifiable, adjective
unfalsifiable, adjective
unfalsified, adjective


1, 3. See misrepresent. 4. rebut, discredit, refute, confute, controvert.
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World English Dictionary
falsify (ˈfɔːlsɪˌfaɪ)
 
vb , -fies, -fying, -fied
1.  to make (a report, evidence, accounts, etc) false or inaccurate by alteration, esp in order to deceive
2.  to prove false; disprove
 
[C15: from Old French falsifier, from Late Latin falsificāre, from Latin falsusfalse + facere to make]
 
'falsifiable
 
adj
 
falsification
 
n
 
'falsifier
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

falsify
mid-15c., "to prove false," from Fr. falsifier, from L.L. falsificare, from L. falsificus "making false," from falsus (see false). Related: Falsified; falsifying. Meaning "to make false" is from c.1500.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Officials falsified statements that he gave them and then insisted that he sign
  the erroneous testimony, he says.
But, turns out one of the scientists who told us downing vino would make us
  live longer falsified and fabricated data.
If two local objects are shown to vacuum free fall non-identically, string
  theory is empirically falsified.
Socially a physical theory which must be logically consistent is considered to
  be the truth until it is falsified.
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