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famed

[feymd] /feɪmd/
adjective
1.
very well known and, often, highly regarded; famous.
Origin of famed
1525-1535
1525-35; fame + -ed3
Related forms
overfamed, adjective

fame

[feym] /feɪm/
noun
1.
widespread reputation, especially of a favorable character; renown; public eminence:
to seek fame as an opera singer.
2.
common estimation or opinion generally held of a person or thing; reputation.
verb (used with object), famed, faming.
3.
Archaic. to have or spread the renown of; to make famous.
Origin
1175-1225; Middle English < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin fāma talk, public opinion, repute, akin to fārī to speak
Related forms
fameless, adjective
outfame, verb (used with object), outfamed, outfaming.
self-fame, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for famed
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Here we saw many types of the Yorkshire man, famed for his shrewdness and fondness for what we would call "dickering."

  • He's not a song-bird, but he's said to be famed for his beauty and his Symmetry.

    A Phenomenal Fauna Carolyn Wells
  • These are set off by the girdle of the flowering cherry, famed among the ancient seven villages of Iimura.

    Bakemono Yashiki (The Haunted House) James S. De Benneville
  • Though I knew it not then, it was the famed “snake-root” (Polygala senega).

    The Quadroon Mayne Reid
  • Maximilian Hostialick was famed for his learning, piety, and humanity.

British Dictionary definitions for famed

fame

/feɪm/
noun
1.
the state of being widely known or recognized; renown; celebrity
2.
(archaic) rumour or public report
verb
3.
(transitive; now usually passive) to make known or famous; celebrate: he was famed for his ruthlessness
Derived Forms
famed, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Latin fāma report; related to fārī to say
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for famed
adj.

"much talked about," 1530s, past participle adjective from fame (v.), c.1300, from Old French famer, from fame (see fame (n.)).

fame

n.

early 13c., "character attributed to someone;" late 13c., "celebrity, renown," from Old French fame "fame, reputation, renown, rumor," from Latin fama "talk, rumor, report, reputation," from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say" (cf. Sanskrit bhanati "speaks;" Latin fari "to say," fabula "narrative, account, tale, story;" Armenian ban, bay "word, term;" Old Church Slavonic bajati "to talk, tell;" Old English boian "to boast," ben "prayer, request;" Greek pheme "talk," phone "voice, sound," phanai "to speak;" Old Irish bann "law").

The goddess Fama was the personification of rumor in Roman mythology. The Latin derivative fabulare was the colloquial word for "speak, talk" since the time of Plautus, whence Spanish hablar.

I've always been afraid I was going to tap the world on the shoulder for 20 years, and when it finally turned around I was going to forget what I had to say. [Tom Waits, "Playboy" magazine interview, March, 1988]

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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