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fearsome

[feer-suh m] /ˈfɪər səm/
adjective
1.
causing fear:
a fearsome noise.
2.
causing awe or respect:
a fearsome self-confidence.
3.
afraid; timid.
Origin of fearsome
1760-1770
1760-70; fear + -some1
Related forms
fearsomely, adverb
fearsomeness, noun
Can be confused
fearful, fearsome.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for fearsome
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • However tempted to a bound, or however startled at some fearsome thing, one word—a "Quiet, Pat!"

    Patroclus and Penelope Theodore Ayrault Dodge
  • At least they had never claimed to have enjoyed so fearsome a sight.

    The Tale of Grunty Pig Arthur Scott Bailey
  • Yon has been a fearsome nicht again, laddie, for yer poor auld aunty.

  • "Bad sign, bad sign," and Mrs. Gibson gave her head a fearsome shake.

    The heart of happy hollow Paul Laurence Dunbar
  • It is a fearsome thing to the bull-moose, this animated machine that is charging down the river at him.

    Adventures in Alaska Samuel Hall Young
British Dictionary definitions for fearsome

fearsome

/ˈfɪəsəm/
adjective
1.
frightening
2.
timorous; afraid
Derived Forms
fearsomely, adverb
fearsomeness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for fearsome
adj.

1768, from fear + -some (1). Related: Fearsomely; fearsomeness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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13
14
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