flaw

1 [flaw]
noun
1.
a feature that mars the perfection of something; defect; fault: beauty without flaw; the flaws in our plan.
2.
a defect impairing legal soundness or validity.
3.
a crack, break, breach, or rent.
verb (used with object)
4.
to produce a flaw in.
verb (used without object)
5.
to contract a flaw; become cracked or defective.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English flaw(e), flage, perhaps < Old Norse flaga sliver, flake

flawless, adjective


1. imperfection, blot, spot. See defect. 3. fissure, rift.
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flaw

2 [flaw]
noun
1.
Also called windflaw. a sudden, usually brief windstorm or gust of wind.
2.
a short spell of rough weather.
3.
Obsolete. a burst of feeling, fury, etc.

Origin:
1475–85; < Old Norse flaga attack, squall

flawy, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
flaw1 (flɔː)
 
n
1.  an imperfection, defect, or blemish
2.  a crack, breach, or rift
3.  law an invalidating fault or defect in a document or proceeding
 
vb
4.  to make or become blemished, defective, or imperfect
 
[C14: probably from Old Norse flaga stone slab; related to Swedish flaga chip, flake, flaw]
 
'flawless1
 
adj
 
'flawlessly1
 
adv
 
'flawlessness1
 
n

flaw2 (flɔː)
 
n
1.  a.  a sudden short gust of wind; squall
 b.  a spell of bad, esp windy, weather
2.  obsolete an outburst of strong feeling
 
[C16: of Scandinavian origin; related to Norwegian flaga squall, gust, Middle Dutch vlāghe]
 
'flawy2
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

flaw
early 14c., "snowflake, spark of fire," from O.N. flaga "stone slab, flake" (see flagstone); sense of "defect, fault" first recorded 1580s, first of character, later (c.1600) of material things; probably via notion of a "fragment" broken off. Related: Flawed (early 15c.).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
And yet local cuisine didn't suffer for the rice's character flaw.
The photos are straight forward and technically almost perfect and without flaw.
Likewise, the fact that the book never discusses feathered dinosaurs or that
  birds are living theropod dinosaurs is a major flaw.
Some scientists said the original finding could be a flaw in the data.
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