fledged

[flejd]

Origin:
1570–80; fledge + -ed2

Dictionary.com Unabridged

fledge

[flej]
verb (used with object), fledged, fledging.
1.
to bring up (a young bird) until it is able to fly.
2.
to furnish with or as if with feathers or plumage.
3.
to provide (an arrow) with feathers.
verb (used without object), fledged, fledging.
4.
(of a young bird) to acquire the feathers necessary for flight.
adjective
5.
Archaic. (of young birds) able to fly.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English flegge (fully-)fledged, Old English *flecge, as variant of -flycge; cognate with Old High German flucki, Middle Low German vlügge (> German flügge); akin to fly1

fledgeless, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
fledge (flɛdʒ)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to feed and care for (a young bird) until it is able to fly
2.  (tr) Also called: fletch to fit (something, esp an arrow) with a feather or feathers
3.  (intr) (of a young bird) to grow feathers
4.  (tr) to cover or adorn with or as if with feathers
 
[Old English -flycge, as in unflycge unfledged; related to Old High German flucki able to fly; see fly1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

fledge
O.E. flycge (Kentish fligge), from W.Gmc. *fluggja- (cf. M.Du. vlugge, Low Ger. flügge). Originally an adj. meaning "having the feathers, fit to fly." As a verb, it is first attested in English 1560s. Related: Fledged; fledging.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
He asked the company for permission to take over an unused parking lot to
  install a full-fledged garden.
At five weeks old they're full-fledged killers, dispatching mice on their own.
Everything from nifty tips on peeling garlic to full-fledged cooking shows are
  available online.
Within less than a second, however, the shell inflates into a full-fledged
  airplane with a six-foot wingspan.
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